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Old 05-13-2017, 05:52 PM   #561
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What is the purpose of the landscape fabric? I've found it does not stop grass from growing through. Maybe the professional stuff would, but the hardware store stuff is not effective for that. it's mostly good for containing stuff.
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Old 05-13-2017, 08:16 PM   #562
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First time tomato grower here.

I bought some tomatoes from Lowes today, bought some potting soil and vegetable fertilizer.

The plants seem to be out growing their little pots they came in and I transplanted them into larger plants. Anyone know if I can put them outside yet or is this still considered too cold?

Also any tips on growing plants/vegetables would be appreciated. We're looking at starting a little garden eventually.
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Old 05-13-2017, 09:00 PM   #563
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First time tomato grower here.

I bought some tomatoes from Lowes today, bought some potting soil and vegetable fertilizer.

The plants seem to be out growing their little pots they came in and I transplanted them into larger plants. Anyone know if I can put them outside yet or is this still considered too cold?

Also any tips on growing plants/vegetables would be appreciated. We're looking at starting a little garden eventually.
It looks like the overnight lows this week will be too cold for the plants. Wait another week. Frost will easily kill them and the forecast is calling for 1 or 2 degrees some nights.
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Old 05-14-2017, 05:27 AM   #564
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First time tomato grower here.

I bought some tomatoes from Lowes today, bought some potting soil and vegetable fertilizer.

The plants seem to be out growing their little pots they came in and I transplanted them into larger plants. Anyone know if I can put them outside yet or is this still considered too cold?

Also any tips on growing plants/vegetables would be appreciated. We're looking at starting a little garden eventually.
Temper them. If daytime temps are no lower than about 45 F (7-8 C), put them outside for an hour or 2 a day, increasing the time as temps increase, to get them used to lower-than-in-house temperatures.
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Old 05-14-2017, 12:15 PM   #565
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First time tomato grower here.

I bought some tomatoes from Lowes today, bought some potting soil and vegetable fertilizer.

The plants seem to be out growing their little pots they came in and I transplanted them into larger plants. Anyone know if I can put them outside yet or is this still considered too cold?

Also any tips on growing plants/vegetables would be appreciated. We're looking at starting a little garden eventually.
Tomatoes like warm feet...so containers that are dark...like black or brown. I plant mine in containers with drip holes in the bottom and set the containers in drip trays. Since we are challenged in Calgary for long hot summer days, try to find an exposure that increases the heat and sun exposure.

If you have a sun facing garage and garage pad, that would be perfect. The concrete garage pad will retain some heat overnight so the tomato's feet will be warmer overnight.

Tomatoes also need calcium so plant them with bone meal. The roots should not be directly in the bone meal though...they should be a couple of inches above. Then as the tomatoes grow, their roots will reach down to where the bone meal is. I put in a good handful for a pot that is about 18 to 24 inches in diameter.

Tomatoes also need even watering so in other words, they don't like to dry out and they certainly don't like flooding. Tomatoes also do not like their leaves to be watered so try to water with a wand that you stick under the foliage close to the ground in the container. Water until you see water coming into the drip tray.

If you grow indeterminate tomatoes, they will need staking or a tomato cage.

Hope that helps.
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Old 05-15-2017, 07:33 PM   #566
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What is the purpose of the landscape fabric? I've found it does not stop grass from growing through. Maybe the professional stuff would, but the hardware store stuff is not effective for that. it's mostly good for containing stuff.
depends on the weight of the fabric, you can get various and usually the weight reflects how long the fabric itself will last. For example a 3.2 OZ is generally 15 year Fabric, 5OZ 25 year, etc.

The common misconception about Landscape Fabric is that it will keep all weeds out, this is not true. Dirt and weed seeds will blow in and grow in your rocks, mulch, etc. That doesn't mean you shouldn't use it as the Landscape fabric will help to deter A LOT of weed growth in your beds.
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Old 05-19-2017, 10:18 AM   #567
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Last year I had my yard prepped for grass with a plan to hydroseed in the fall. Unfortunately, my final grade certificate was rejected and it snowed before I could get it fixed and reinspected. The grading is now fixed and I am patiently waiting for the grading inspector to return. The problem is that my beautiful black dirt is now starting to green up all on its own. It isn't full blown weed city yet but there pretty liberally covered in small 2-3" weeds.
Any advice on my next step? I will need to rake before hydroseeding but I assume removing the weeds is my first step. Should I go nuclear with a layer of round-up to kill everything then hydroseed over their corpses or rent a rototiller and just break everything up before seeding?
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Old 05-19-2017, 10:23 AM   #568
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Last year I had my yard prepped for grass with a plan to hydroseed in the fall. Unfortunately, my final grade certificate was rejected and it snowed before I could get it fixed and reinspected. The grading is now fixed and I am patiently waiting for the grading inspector to return. The problem is that my beautiful black dirt is now starting to green up all on its own. It isn't full blown weed city yet but there pretty liberally covered in small 2-3" weeds.
Any advice on my next step? I will need to rake before hydroseeding but I assume removing the weeds is my first step. Should I go nuclear with a layer of round-up to kill everything then hydroseed over their corpses or rent a rototiller and just break everything up before seeding?
Thanks
rototiller won't stop the weeds, they will just regrow wherever their corpses are left.

You can Roundup the entire area, but make sure to wait until it goes inert before you seed. I think it is usually 10-14 days for Roundup.

Or you could lay sod?
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Old 05-19-2017, 10:38 AM   #569
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Can you lay sod on top of the weeds if they aren't very tall yet?
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Old 05-19-2017, 10:50 AM   #570
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Can you lay sod on top of the weeds if they aren't very tall yet?
You can lay sod on top of anything you want. I just won't guarantee that the sod will survive

Honestly though, so long as the sod roots can reach down into soil relatively easily, then it should work, and I doubt the weeds will be able to break through the sod to sunlight.
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Old 05-19-2017, 11:02 AM   #571
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Since you'll likely need to till or rake the dirt anyways again, I would use that opportunity to grab the weeds (likely loose at this point) as best you can that end up on top. Shouldn't interfere with sod even if they're still there but under the tilled surface (as long as the top is soil); any that make it through the sod can be dealt with after.
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Old 05-19-2017, 11:08 AM   #572
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In our back planter the only thing we actually like is the lilac bush (fully mature already). Everything else that grows in there is basically just weeds and we'd like to start fresh, keeping the lilac in there of course.

Can I just get Round Up (probably the one you attach to a hose) and go wild, being careful to avoid the lilac bush? The lilac itself would be easy to avoid, and it seems no mater how much we fight the weeds, they always come back. Not sure if the round up in the soil would then kill the lilac?

If that is a bad idea, are there any alternatives? I just hate looking in the planter and seeing all this ugly growth that I just can't seem to get rid of.
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Old 05-19-2017, 07:09 PM   #573
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In our back planter the only thing we actually like is the lilac bush (fully mature already). Everything else that grows in there is basically just weeds and we'd like to start fresh, keeping the lilac in there of course.

Can I just get Round Up (probably the one you attach to a hose) and go wild, being careful to avoid the lilac bush? The lilac itself would be easy to avoid, and it seems no mater how much we fight the weeds, they always come back. Not sure if the round up in the soil would then kill the lilac?

If that is a bad idea, are there any alternatives? I just hate looking in the planter and seeing all this ugly growth that I just can't seem to get rid of.
well, round up will certainly kill the weeds but wont go into the soil and kill the lilac, assuming you don't completely saturate the soil, which in that case the hose end attachment is probably a little aggressive. If you really want to keep those weeds from coming back up hire a professional, they will probably put some casaron down. Casaron is a pre-emergent that basically forms a layer on the ground, anything trying to penetrate through that layer is killed, perfect for established woody plants you are looking to keep weeds out of you. It's expensive but works really, really well
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Old 05-19-2017, 11:22 PM   #574
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So I was hardening my tomatoes until I forgot to take it in one night and now they look so withery and sad. The leaves have some white substance which apparently to google is from the shock. Whoopsies. Hope they can come back. One of the two plants look okay, the other, well... let's hope it survives. Any tips to bring it back to life?

Also, I bought a bag of pro-mix potting soil and some miracle grow fertilizer for tomatoes. Is this soil any good and should I be fertilizing it already?
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Old 05-20-2017, 09:42 AM   #575
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So I was hardening my tomatoes until I forgot to take it in one night and now they look so withery and sad. The leaves have some white substance which apparently to google is from the shock. Whoopsies. Hope they can come back. One of the two plants look okay, the other, well... let's hope it survives. Any tips to bring it back to life?

Also, I bought a bag of pro-mix potting soil and some miracle grow fertilizer for tomatoes. Is this soil any good and should I be fertilizing it already?
I don't fertilize for at least a month. There is enough nutrition in the new soil for that period of time.

Then I fertilize about once every 10 days. I use the same fertilizer that you bought. It is water soluble so you can use it one of two ways. You can dissolve 1 Tbsp in about 1 gallon of water and use that or sprinkle the Tbsp of fertilizer evenly over the soil in the tomato pot and then water it in. I usually go the second route...easier and quicker.

Not sure what that white substance is on your tomatoes. Is it on the stem of the plant as well or just the leaves? Can you actually scrape it off? Picture?

Sounds more like frost bite to me...in which case the leaves will dry up in those places. If the stem is ok the plant should come back.

EDIT: I should add that I cut back on the frequency of fertilizing middle to third week of August. You want to encourage development and ripening of fruit at that time instead of a bunch of new growth.

Also, if you have grown indeterminate tomatoes, start pruning the tops once they are 5 to 6 feet tall...same principle, encourage fruit development instead of new growth.

Last edited by redforever; 05-20-2017 at 02:24 PM.
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Old 05-20-2017, 06:48 PM   #576
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Built two new cedar garden boxes today, to match the larger one I built two years ago.

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Old 05-21-2017, 05:54 PM   #577
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Anyone have any tips on getting rid of and preventing dog pee grass burns? We put sod into our back yard late last year, and a quarter of it is already yellow from the dog's pee. I have tried purchasing "Dog Rocks" for the dog's water, but have had little success with it.
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Old 05-21-2017, 06:30 PM   #578
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Trade the dog for a cat?
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Old 05-21-2017, 06:35 PM   #579
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Anyone have any tips on getting rid of and preventing dog pee grass burns? We put sod into our back yard late last year, and a quarter of it is already yellow from the dog's pee. I have tried purchasing "Dog Rocks" for the dog's water, but have had little success with it.
Can you fence off between the side of your house and the existing fence to make a dog run? Should be pretty cheap and easy. Would also contain the crap, too.
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Old 05-21-2017, 08:39 PM   #580
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We bought a fertilizer product from a garden centre that worked really well to prevent new burns. You apply it three times a year and the dog pee doesn't burn the grass. Worked wonders. I don't know that name, but look at reputable garden centres.
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