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Old 09-06-2022, 04:57 PM   #1
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My wife was double vaxxed when she found herself pregnant (which was in part my fault).

She held off on getting the booster until after she gave birth.

My question is: is there a level of immunity that would be passed on? If so, how long would that last?

Babies can get a covid shot at 6 months, but I'm wondering about the baby's level of protection before then.
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Old 09-06-2022, 06:20 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Maritime Q-Scout View Post
My wife was double vaxxed when she found herself pregnant (which was in part my fault).

She held off on getting the booster until after she gave birth.

My question is: is there a level of immunity that would be passed on? If so, how long would that last?

Babies can get a covid shot at 6 months, but I'm wondering about the baby's level of protection before then.
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At six months of age, researchers found detectable levels of protective antibodies in infants born to vaccinated mothers.
Titers, or antibody levels, were lower in unvaccinated, COVID-infected mothers at delivery and in their infants.
https://www.massgeneral.org/news/pre...heir%20infants.
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Old 09-06-2022, 06:50 PM   #3
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Thanks, but I don't think that study applies in my case, it compares mothers who were vaccinated during preganancy (between 20 and 32 weeks) to those who were unvaccinated but contracted COVID-19 during preganancy.

My wife was vaccinated pre-preganancy, and did not contract it.
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Old 09-07-2022, 02:27 PM   #4
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My wife was double vaxxed when she found herself pregnant (which was in part my fault).
Do we need to have a little talk about how the bolded works?
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Old 09-07-2022, 02:52 PM   #5
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I would suggest asking your doctor. I'm guessing you are wondering how paranoid you need to be before the baby can get a shot, which is a good question. My oldest was a micro-premie, so I carried a long stick and lost my #### on my wife's aunt who tried to kiss the baby when she was still in an isolate. If I was you, I'd play it safe for the first six months or so. Limit contacts, wear a mask in public, and be careful about who you let handle the baby.
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Old 09-08-2022, 12:16 PM   #6
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Also, since your wife now has her booster, she would pass along antibodies in her breast milk.
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Old 09-14-2022, 07:09 PM   #7
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Look at the national Statistics on an age basis to help your decision. Unless the child has a pre existing severe health issue there’s an almost zero chance of severe outcome from catching this. This isn’t an opinion - just look at the stats yourself. Also note that Denmark has done just this and it’s extremely difficult now for anyone under 18 to get a shot. Easy enough to confirm online.
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Old 09-14-2022, 09:38 PM   #8
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Look at the national Statistics on an age basis to help your decision. Unless the child has a pre existing severe health issue thereís an almost zero chance of severe outcome from catching this. This isnít an opinion - just look at the stats yourself. Also note that Denmark has done just this and itís extremely difficult now for anyone under 18 to get a shot. Easy enough to confirm online.
OrÖ get this: ask your doctor.
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Old 09-14-2022, 09:51 PM   #9
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Look at the national Statistics on an age basis to help your decision. Unless the child has a pre existing severe health issue thereís an almost zero chance of severe outcome from catching this. This isnít an opinion - just look at the stats yourself. Also note that Denmark has done just this and itís extremely difficult now for anyone under 18 to get a shot. Easy enough to confirm online.
I don't think that's really true. In Alberta, 0-1 year olds have a higher population hospitalization rate (i.e. # of total hospitalizations per 100K children that age) than any age group under 60 years old and a higher ICU rate than any age group under 50.

Thankfully none have died, but other than seniors, they're probably the highest risk age group.
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Old 09-14-2022, 10:44 PM   #10
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I don't think that's really true. In Alberta, 0-1 year olds have a higher population hospitalization rate (i.e. # of total hospitalizations per 100K children that age) than any age group under 60 years old and a higher ICU rate than any age group under 50.

Thankfully none have died, but other than seniors, they're probably the highest risk age group.
So are these 2 highlighted phrases correlated? I'm focusing exclusively on deaths per age demographic. From what I've seen, per the Alberta stats page link below, I can't agree with your statement regarding the young. For over 50... yes substantially higher and the links below support that unquestionably.

I suspect you might be looking at case rate for the infants on the link I'd attached? The CASE RATE is disproportionate as undoubtedly far far more infants got infected but weren't tested. Saw that in my own extended family, friends, and colleagues where weeks AFTER the parents were infected they got the kids tested and found the antibodies but the kids had zero symptoms (so they weren't tested at the time). Also, how many incidents of Covid are actually reported now? I know quite a few friends/colleagues who caught it the last few months and did not notify any medical personnel.

I'm saying look at the morbidity (death) rate provincially and federally (and in USA).

https://health-infobase.canada.ca/covid-19/
- Go to Figure 7, choose "deceased" from the drop-down. Out of ~44k deceased 38 children/infants (under 11yrs old) passed away per the stats. Not to minimize any death but statistically this is very small.

https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID...Ethnicity.aspx
- This is California (mainly because I didn't spend much time looking for all states and more details) however my point about age, mortality, and count generally holds true.

https://www.alberta.ca/stats/covid-1...evere-outcomes
- Look at Table 3 and deaths in that young age group. It doesn't copy/paste at all here, but the Alberta stats are showing 1 death. Yes it is non-zero, but statistically... compared to all deaths... negligible.



Again... I'm not minimizing the importance of life, of any age. And nobody wants themselves or a loved one to become "that" statistic either.

Last edited by RichieRich; 09-14-2022 at 10:48 PM.
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Old 09-14-2022, 11:01 PM   #11
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So are these 2 highlighted phrases correlated?

I'm focusing exclusively on deaths per age demographic. From what I've seen, per the Alberta stats page link below, I can't agree with your statement regarding the young. For over 50... yes substantially higher and the links below support that unquestionably.
Severe COVID can have long-term impacts on a person, many of which we might not even know about yet. Focusing only on deaths when talking about infants is ridiculous. Once they hit 1-2 years of age, COVID becomes much less of a risk. But newborns in particular are at a fairly high risk for serious complications, just as they are for the flu.

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I suspect you might be looking at case rate for the infants on the link I'd attached? The CASE RATE is disproportionate as undoubtedly far far more infants got infected but weren't tested. Saw that in my own extended family, friends, and colleagues where weeks AFTER the parents were infected they got the kids tested and found the antibodies but the kids had zero symptoms (so they weren't tested at the time). Also, how many incidents of Covid are actually reported now? I know quite a few friends/colleagues who caught it the last few months and did not notify any medical personnel.
No, I'm looking at population rate, which removes case reporting as a factor. It's simply # of hospitalized or ICU COVID cases in each age range divided by that age's total population in Alberta. So in Alberta's case, there have been 426 hospitalizations among the ~50K 0-1 year olds, so nearly 1% of the population. By comparison, there have been 560 hospitalizations among 10-19 year olds, despite that group having a population that's 10x the size of the 0-1 group.

And of course, many of the older groups' numbers are heavily influenced by pre-vaccine data. If you exclude that data for the vaccine-eligible ages (which gives a better idea of current risk), only 70+ year olds have a higher population hospitalization rate than 0-1 year olds do.
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Old 09-15-2022, 08:52 AM   #12
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While the risk of severe disease in young children is low, it's not zero according to Craig Jenne, an associate professor in the department of microbiology, immunology and infectious diseases at the University of Calgary.

"We have unfortunately had kids hospitalized here in Alberta in this age group, and even in the ICU," Jenne said.

"We really do want to see a little better uptake of this. We want to see a larger percentage of the population protected. And we really want to use all of the tools we have to keep these youngest Albertans out of the hospital."
Craig Jenne is an associate professor in the department of microbiology, immunology and infectious diseases at the University of Calgary. (Colin Hall/CBC)

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calga...urge-1.6577574


Our experts are recommending it.
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Old 09-15-2022, 10:31 AM   #13
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Severe COVID can have long-term impacts on a person, many of which we might not even know about yet. Focusing only on deaths when talking about infants is ridiculous. Once they hit 1-2 years of age, COVID becomes much less of a risk. But newborns in particular are at a fairly high risk for serious complications, just as they are for the flu.

No, I'm looking at population rate, which removes case reporting as a factor. It's simply # of hospitalized or ICU COVID cases in each age range divided by that age's total population in Alberta. So in Alberta's case, there have been 426 hospitalizations among the ~50K 0-1 year olds, so nearly 1% of the population. By comparison, there have been 560 hospitalizations among 10-19 year olds, despite that group having a population that's 10x the size of the 0-1 group.

And of course, many of the older groups' numbers are heavily influenced by pre-vaccine data. If you exclude that data for the vaccine-eligible ages (which gives a better idea of current risk), only 70+ year olds have a higher population hospitalization rate than 0-1 year olds do.
Not taking a side here, but the number of babies who have transitioned through 0-1 yr over almost 3 years would be triple that number.
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Old 09-15-2022, 11:12 AM   #14
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Not taking a side here, but the number of babies who have transitioned through 0-1 yr over almost 3 years would be triple that number.
True, but almost 90% of the 0-1 year old hospitalizations have occurred in the last 12 months, which eliminates that factor. And if you look at just the last 12 months for every age group (which also removes the period when the vast majority of the population wasn't fully vaccinated), the numbers are pretty clear:

Hospitalizations per 100K population:

0-1: 707
1-4: 163
5-9: 62
10-19: 72
20-29: 173
30-39: 224
40-49: 247
50-59: 385
60-69: 677
70-79: 1429
80+: 3510


ICU per 100K population:

0-1: 129
1-4: 16
5-9: 5
10-19: 8
20-29: 17
30-39: 24
40-49: 48
50-59: 81
60-69: 124
70-79: 170
80+: 101


So the population hospitalization and ICU risk for 0-1 year olds is about on par with someone in their late 60s/early 70s. Not astronomical by any means, but worthy of taking more precautions than for children of other ages.
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Old 09-15-2022, 03:51 PM   #15
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True, but almost 90% of the 0-1 year old hospitalizations have occurred in the last 12 months, which eliminates that factor. And if you look at just the last 12 months for every age group (which also removes the period when the vast majority of the population wasn't fully vaccinated), the numbers are pretty clear:

Hospitalizations per 100K population:

0-1: 707
1-4: 163
5-9: 62
10-19: 72
20-29: 173
30-39: 224
40-49: 247
50-59: 385
60-69: 677
70-79: 1429
80+: 3510


ICU per 100K population:

0-1: 129
1-4: 16
5-9: 5
10-19: 8
20-29: 17
30-39: 24
40-49: 48
50-59: 81
60-69: 124
70-79: 170
80+: 101


So the population hospitalization and ICU risk for 0-1 year olds is about on par with someone in their late 60s/early 70s. Not astronomical by any means, but worthy of taking more precautions than for children of other ages.
Just noticed that using a single year of age would require a different method of calculation. This is what you have shown here.

This looks similar to the flu, which affects both ends of the age spectrum, as I believe you stated earlier.
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Old 09-16-2022, 01:05 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Maritime Q-Scout View Post
My wife was double vaxxed when she found herself pregnant (which was in part my fault).

She held off on getting the booster until after she gave birth.

My question is: is there a level of immunity that would be passed on? If so, how long would that last?

Babies can get a covid shot at 6 months, but I'm wondering about the baby's level of protection before then.
As I understand it having just been through all of this:

If your wife is vaccinated, the infant will have some protection.
If your wife got vaccinated or boosted while pregnant, the infant will probably have more protection.
If your wife is breast feeding and vaccinated/boosted they will get some protection through the breast milk.

Whether it's covid, the flu, or any other disease you should probably be limiting infant's time around crowds, sanitizing, etc until they get their first round of shots anyways. My (not a doctor) perspective is that the risk of covid vs any other disease is probably not significantly different, they're all bad when they're that small.

Our little one is 6 months old today but AHS says I can't book his appointment until tomorrow (even though I'm booking for next week) because of their system limitations.

Last edited by Torture; 09-16-2022 at 01:10 PM.
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Old 09-21-2022, 01:02 PM   #17
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My baby has had Covid twice now. The first time she was 3-4 months old. My partner had been vaccinated once prior to giving birth.

My baby, thankfully, had relatively mild symptoms, but did have a fever we had to treat with baby Tylenol the first time. Overall, severe cases in babies are extremely rare. The flu or various types of diarrhea inducing diseases are far more deadly than Covid for babies.
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Old 09-23-2022, 10:37 AM   #18
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6 month old got his first Covid shot this week, didn't even cry. What a champ.
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Old 09-23-2022, 02:30 PM   #19
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My baby has had Covid twice now. The first time she was 3-4 months old. My partner had been vaccinated once prior to giving birth.

My baby, thankfully, had relatively mild symptoms, but did have a fever we had to treat with baby Tylenol the first time. Overall, severe cases in babies are extremely rare. The flu or various types of diarrhea inducing diseases are far more deadly than Covid for babies.
Co-worker's 3 week old grandson ended up in hospital for 7 days on oxygen.
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