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Old 11-23-2016, 04:56 PM   #21
CorsiHockeyLeague
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Apparently Kunkstyle is the sous vide champ. Question now that I bought one, does it make any different to cook a steak with a bone in it? Does that mess up the process or anything?

Also, do you use a torch to finish? I have one essentially just for creme brulee, and cmon, if that works, that's what I'm gonna do.
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Old 11-23-2016, 05:01 PM   #22
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I have bought a torch but I haven't tried it yet. I am going to butter sear like before and then when I flip the steak torch it. It looked really fun in a youtube video but I may die at the same time.
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Old 11-23-2016, 05:07 PM   #23
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Torch works great. In my opinion better than a pan or grill dear as it doesn't cook the meet further.
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Old 11-23-2016, 05:11 PM   #24
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Here's two links I liked for testing cook times and temperatures.

Eggs: http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/10/s...bout-eggs.html

Steak: http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/06/f...ide-steak.html

Lifehacker also has an interesting sous-vide series. Never would have though to try it on cheesecake.

http://lifehacker.com/tag/will-it-sous-vide

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Old 11-23-2016, 05:17 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by CorsiHockeyLeague View Post
Apparently Kunkstyle is the sous vide champ. Question now that I bought one, does it make any different to cook a steak with a bone in it? Does that mess up the process or anything?
The only thing it might do is to increase the cooking time to get the whole steak to the preset temperature with the bone acting as an insulator to part of the steak.
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Old 11-23-2016, 05:31 PM   #26
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Am I understanding this correctly? Extra hours of cooking for it to come out more evenly cooked. Won't that will really only impact a few outside bites? Or does it completely change the flavor like smoking for example?

I mean, how uneven does you food come out normally???
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Old 11-23-2016, 05:38 PM   #27
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Apparently Kunkstyle is the sous vide champ.

Also, do you use a torch to finish? I have one essentially just for creme brulee, and cmon, if that works, that's what I'm gonna do.
Hardly a champ, just love cooking with it and my friends that don't cook or don't use a sous-vide got tired of me talking about it all the time. Although I have basically sold 4 of them for Anova...

A torch works quite well, and as GGG pointed out, no extra cooking, just a nice char.

I still use cast because I like a nice butter sear. One trick I found that works wonders with cast is patting the meat dry with paper towel. Instead of putting it in the cast and having to evaporate the water before the sear can start, it sears immediately, so you cut down the time in the cast to avoid over-cooking.
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Of course you could just not overcook your chicken using any of the old fashioned methods, an instant read thermometer does the job fine and gets you a nice crust flavoured with garlic, herbs and a little butter.
Safe to say you've never cooked with one before then?

Using your example of chicken, it's not a perfect evenly shaped cube. You've got an end that might be 5mm thick, while the middle is 30mm thick. The thing with sous-vide is that the thin end will be a perfect 60 degrees, while the thick middle part is also a perfect 60 degrees. No burnt or dry ends, no undercooked thick parts. No worrying about flipping it or taking out of the pan in time.

Yeah, I can cook chicken in an oven or steak in a cast and do a fine job, but the sous-vide is leaps and bounds above "just fine".
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Old 11-23-2016, 05:46 PM   #28
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DoubleF's dummy understanding of sous vide...

1. Place meat foods in "ziploc like bag" with flavorings. Bag will trap in juices. More juices retained = betterer food + deeper understanding of religion (Everyone seems to talk about heaven).

2. Boil it at the best temperature. To figure out what you have as temperature, use: A) Thermometer B) Sous vide probe thingy (WAY SUPERIOR!). Adjust as necessary. What is best temperature? Google that ####.

3. After a few hours, you get a food that is boiled in its own juices. It is now in a state nearly ready to consume. It's gonna be a bit weird looking though. Finish that sucker off on a pan/use a blow torch/BBQ/significant other's hangry laser death eyes (makes great grill marks) to make the food seem more normal looking.
Did I mention you should have grabbed a burger to eat while you were waiting? Oh dang I'm sorry. I forgot to mention you can sous vide a burger. You should have sous vided that before whatever you started sous vide~ing.

4. Gather yourself +100 points in Haute cuisine. Brag to friends. Make up new silly phrases like, "Restaurants hates it. Revolutionary cooking method could make expensive nights out a thing of the past!". Make snarky remarks like, "My $150 sous vide can beat up your Kamado smoker!"

Did I miss anything?

I kinda want one, but I don't know what I'd be getting into. It almost feels like a superior version of a slow cooker. I might die of hunger before this fantastic cooking method finishes cooking.
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Old 11-23-2016, 05:50 PM   #29
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You don't boil it. The temperatures vary depending on what you're trying to cook. The temperatures are high enough to cook, but not that high. The whole point is to find a sweet spot where the food you're trying to cook will be prepared, but in a very controlled, uniform environment.
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Old 11-23-2016, 06:03 PM   #30
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After a few hours
There's plenty of things that cook under an hour. You can do an entire tenderloin in an hour.

Also, you don't sous-vide a burger appetizer while waiting. You kill that time with a bourbon old-fashioned using home-made bitters, waxing and grooming your beard, ironing your skinny jeans and wool vest, and debating the dying art of the oxford comma.
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Old 11-23-2016, 06:21 PM   #31
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Does anyone have a recommendation for a cheaper vacuum sealer ? Lots of Amazon all around $100-$150but no idea which are any good

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Old 11-23-2016, 06:24 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by polak View Post
Am I understanding this correctly? Extra hours of cooking for it to come out more evenly cooked. Won't that will really only impact a few outside bites? Or does it completely change the flavor like smoking for example?

I mean, how uneven does you food come out normally???
From what I understand (I just post the deals I see), it's a combination of the even cooking, keeping in all the moisture and flavor.

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Old 11-23-2016, 06:44 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polak View Post
Am I understanding this correctly? Extra hours of cooking for it to come out more evenly cooked. Won't that will really only impact a few outside bites? Or does it completely change the flavor like smoking for example?

I mean, how uneven does you food come out normally???
The difference between properly cooked high quality cuts and sous vide high quality cuts is negligible.

However you can turn a cut that you would normally stew or braise into and amazingly tender steak. It allows all of the fat and sinew to melt without over cooking the meat leaving it tender all the way through. For wild game which is lean it is by far the best way to cook it.

So it isn't about even cooking it's about melting fat like any other indirect heat cooking method but in this case it doesn't get water logged like braising or dry like baking
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Old 11-23-2016, 07:19 PM   #34
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The difference between properly cooked high quality cuts and sous vide high quality cuts is negligible.
Yes and no. The big thing for me is that it removes the mistake factor. It's generally a pretty idiot proof way of food preparation, with consistent, predictable results. If you're using a grill, or a flat top, or an oven, or something else, you have to take into account temperature variances, flare ups, time, etc. etc. in a way that you wouldn't have to with sous vide.
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Old 11-23-2016, 10:34 PM   #35
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You don't boil it. The temperatures vary depending on what you're trying to cook. The temperatures are high enough to cook, but not that high. The whole point is to find a sweet spot where the food you're trying to cook will be prepared, but in a very controlled, uniform environment.
Well, yes it's not "boil". My post was a slight jest and jab. I get how it works. I just don't get how long it takes.

Immersion in water to allow for uniform cooking.

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There's plenty of things that cook under an hour. You can do an entire tenderloin in an hour.

Also, you don't sous-vide a burger appetizer while waiting. You kill that time with a bourbon old-fashioned using home-made bitters, waxing and grooming your beard, ironing your skinny jeans and wool vest, and debating the dying art of the oxford comma.


But an entire tenderloin in an hour? Hmm... I am intrigued.

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From what I understand (I just post the deals I see), it's a combination of the even cooking, keeping in all the moisture and flavor.

Yup, saw those pictures. I was impressed by similar pics. What I really didn't have a good idea was whether I could prepare some of these items in the same speed as regular cooking, or whether it was something I'd have to set aside time like a slow cooker.

To be honest, an hour of cooking wouldn't be bad for meats, I could use that time for bourbon, or dessert and other dish prep.

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Yes and no. The big thing for me is that it removes the mistake factor. It's generally a pretty idiot proof way of food preparation, with consistent, predictable results. If you're using a grill, or a flat top, or an oven, or something else, you have to take into account temperature variances, flare ups, time, etc. etc. in a way that you wouldn't have to with sous vide.
Honest question, is it as idiot proof as a pressure cooker? The results of sous vide are undeniable, but I have huge concerns regarding my patience and getting hangry. Also, how do you figure out whether the meat is "done"?


Whelp, I am going to get that Anova sous vide then. It seems like most of those that already have given enough evidence for me to believe I will have no such issue with the item.
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Old 11-23-2016, 10:46 PM   #36
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Well, yes it's not "boil". My post was a slight jest and jab. I get how it works. I just don't get how long it takes.

Immersion in water to allow for uniform cooking.





But an entire tenderloin in an hour? Hmm... I am intrigued.



Yup, saw those pictures. I was impressed by similar pics. What I really didn't have a good idea was whether I could prepare some of these items in the same speed as regular cooking, or whether it was something I'd have to set aside time like a slow cooker.

To be honest, an hour of cooking wouldn't be bad for meats, I could use that time for bourbon, or dessert and other dish prep.



Honest question, is it as idiot proof as a pressure cooker? The results of sous vide are undeniable, but I have huge concerns regarding my patience and getting hangry. Also, how do you figure out whether the meat is "done"?


Whelp, I am going to get that Anova sous vide then. It seems like most of those that already have given enough evidence for me to believe I will have no such issue with the item.
Its not in the least bit idiot proof, low temp cooking is potentially very dangerous, the food you use has to be very fresh, your food handling has to be sterile and the equipment has to be rock solid reliable (specifically around consistent temperature throughout the bath), there is a huge potential for food poisoning with this technique
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Old 11-23-2016, 10:58 PM   #37
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Its not in the least bit idiot proof, low temp cooking is potentially very dangerous, the food you use has to be very fresh, your food handling has to be sterile and the equipment has to be rock solid reliable (specifically around consistent temperature throughout the bath), there is a huge potential for food poisoning with this technique
Hmm, interesting.

I've always had a similar hesitation with slow cookers... What leans me towards a sous vide is that using regular cooking/baking methods to finish off the food will help to alleviate such a concern.

Furthermore, I wouldn't have a sous vide float for an hour or two then turn it on. It would be the initial immediate cooking method of choice while I continue prepping other foods for a meal. Pan frying on an induction stove has turned into a clusterfata for me. Baking is close I guess, I had no issues with turkey, but I had issues last time I tried to make a roast and I guess I'm just grabbing this to experiment with other cooking options.

Good to know it's not completely idiot proof though.
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Old 11-23-2016, 11:01 PM   #38
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Was thinking this has botulism written all over it.
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Old 11-23-2016, 11:05 PM   #39
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Its not in the least bit idiot proof, low temp cooking is potentially very dangerous, the food you use has to be very fresh, your food handling has to be sterile and the equipment has to be rock solid reliable (specifically around consistent temperature throughout the bath), there is a huge potential for food poisoning with this technique
Well, follow some pretty simple, common sense rules about food and you should probably be ok. I mean, if you prepare chicken or pork at 45 celcius, then that's just your own fault. There are plenty of guides and instructions on what temperatures you should reach at minimum for various proteins. Having said that, there are SOME risks... with garlic for example.
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Old 11-23-2016, 11:05 PM   #40
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Hmm, interesting.

I've always had a similar hesitation with slow cookers... What leans me towards a sous vide is that using regular cooking/baking methods to finish off the food will help to alleviate such a concern.

Furthermore, I wouldn't have a sous vide float for an hour or two then turn it on. It would be the initial immediate cooking method of choice while I continue prepping other foods for a meal. Pan frying on an induction stove has turned into a clusterfata for me. Baking is close I guess, I had no issues with turkey, but I had issues last time I tried to make a roast and I guess I'm just grabbing this to experiment with other cooking options.

Good to know it's not completely idiot proof though.
Sous Vide is a technique that takes many many hours, the worry is the meat in the center, not the outside (as with all cooking to be frank) searing the outside isn't going to help with that at all, unless you cooked it so long you completely make the sous vide part pointless.
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