Calgarypuck Forums - The Unofficial Calgary Flames Fan Community
Old 06-20-2011, 02:37 PM   #61
bossy22
Powerplay Quarterback
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Exp:
Default

I used to ride a 56, because most bike shops will go by height, and based on that, I need a 56. However, when I'd do 60km plus rides, my neck and shoulders would bother me, so when I bought my Cervelo RS, I got a pro fit done at tri-it. Based on my flexibility, or lack there of, leg length, torso, etc, I needed a 54 RS. Now I can go well beyond 60km without issue.

Pro-fits can be pricey. Check out www.competitivecyclist.com. They have a fit calculator, and guidelines for three styles of fit. You just need to pick out a bike, and then it offers the fit calculator.
bossy22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 02:42 PM   #62
BlackEleven
Redundant Minister of Redundancy
 
BlackEleven's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Montreal
Exp:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TimSJ View Post
I think it is likely too big for her but she is going to go and check it out. I can't remember the size of the bike she rented for her race last weekend.

Thanks for looking.
How tall is she? It depends on the individual of course, but for a 54cm frame, I think any shorter than 5'8-5'9 would probably be an uncomfortable ride.
BlackEleven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 03:08 PM   #63
bossy22
Powerplay Quarterback
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Exp:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kipperfan View Post
And since we're on the topic, any other mountain bikers out there with good (see "off the beaten path") trail recommendations for the Canmore/Kananaskis/Bragg Creek areas?
Bragg Creek is still pretty soupy out there from what I've heard.

Canmore is in decent shape. Benchlands, the Nordic Center and the highline trail are all very rideable. I rode the Nordic Center and Highline a couple of weeks back, and they were in great condition, especially highline. With the rain, you may want to call the Nordic Center or one of the bike shops before you go.

I haven't ridden Kananaskis in a couple of years, so I can't comment.

Has anyone ridden Minnewanka yet?
bossy22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 03:15 PM   #64
habernac
Franchise Player
 
habernac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: sector 7G
Exp:
Default

if you're doing Minnewanka on a bike, do it soon:

http://www.pinkbike.com/news/Lake-Mi...tice-2011.html
habernac is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to habernac For This Useful Post:
Old 06-20-2011, 03:55 PM   #65
Tinordi
Franchise Player
 
Tinordi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Exp:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Table 5 View Post
For you work commuters out there, how do you get around the hygiene/presentation issue. Do you roll in your work clothes? Change once you get to work? Don't you still stink even if you change?

I've always liked the idea of biking to work, but I know I'd be a sweaty pig after riding for a measly 10 minutes. The idea of having to change multiple times a day doesn't appeal to me, and it seems like most work environments wouldn't have shower access.
Get a three ring binder or a firm snap or elastic document portfolio.

Then fold your shirt up according to shirt folding techniques on youtube. Likewise for pants and put your tie, the shirt and the pants into the binder or portfolio, put it in a heavy duty plastic bad and always bring an extra undershirt.

Couple that with a stick of deoderant in your office and a sweaty pat-down using bathroom paper towels and you'll look ship shape for work in the morning.
Tinordi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 04:00 PM   #66
rd_aaron
Scoring Winger
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Exp:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinordi View Post
Get a three ring binder or a firm snap or elastic document portfolio.

Then fold your shirt up according to shirt folding techniques on youtube. Likewise for pants and put your tie, the shirt and the pants into the binder or portfolio, put it in a heavy duty plastic bad and always bring an extra undershirt.

Couple that with a stick of deoderant in your office and a sweaty pat-down using bathroom paper towels and you'll look ship shape for work in the morning.
Luckily we have a small gym and change rooms in our office so I just shower when I get to work.
rd_aaron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 04:23 PM   #67
awildermode
Franchise Player
 
awildermode's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Exp:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pylon View Post
54" Might be a bit big for a lady. I am 6'1" and ride a 56". Albeit fit is personal, and I like my bikes a bit on the smaller side.
I think you mean 54cm and 56cm, which would be about a 21" and 22" bike.

Size of bike is (usually) based on seat tube length and or top tube length. obviously depends on manufacture and geometry of bike. generally, road bikes are size in centimeters, mountain bikes in inches.
__________________
AS SEEN ON TV
awildermode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 04:41 PM   #68
pylon
NOT Chris Butler
 
pylon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Vote Threeve!
Exp:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by awildermode View Post
I think you mean 54cm and 56cm, which would be about a 21" and 22" bike.

Size of bike is (usually) based on seat tube length and or top tube length. obviously depends on manufacture and geometry of bike. generally, road bikes are size in centimeters, mountain bikes in inches.
lol, thanks. MTB are inches. That would be a hell of a reach.
pylon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 11:00 PM   #69
awildermode
Franchise Player
 
awildermode's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Exp:
Default

I know Chara is into cycling, wonder what size his bike is

__________________
AS SEEN ON TV
awildermode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2011, 11:15 PM   #70
Lee of Red
Backup Goalie
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Exp:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by habernac View Post
if you're doing Minnewanka on a bike, do it soon:

http://www.pinkbike.com/news/Lake-Mi...tice-2011.html
Quote:
my mate's girlfriend is a bear and she tries to stop him from riding all the time.
lmao
Lee of Red is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 07:41 AM   #71
TimSJ
First Line Centre
 
TimSJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Saint John, NB
Exp:
Default

Wife is headed to her local shop today to get fitted properly and look at a few differnte bikes. They have a couple of closeout any opinions on either of these bikes both are priced at $1000 and i figure i can bargin a bit more with them.

Cannondale Synapse Road bikes. Aluminum frames (made in USA), carbon forks, Shimano Tiagra 9 speed components

Cannondale CAAD8-6C, 2010 model, Aluminum Frame, Carbon Fork, Tiagra 9 speed, compact crank

Thanks for the help.
__________________

TimSJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 07:56 AM   #72
Sr. Mints
First Line Centre
 
Sr. Mints's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Exp:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pylon View Post
Holy crap, where did you find a kit that lets you to mount your SOFA, to your seat post?
I bought the seat at either Canadian Tire or Sport Chek, and just used the mounting hardware that was on the old seat.
__________________
Sr. Mints is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 07:58 AM   #73
BlackEleven
Redundant Minister of Redundancy
 
BlackEleven's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Montreal
Exp:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TimSJ View Post
Wife is headed to her local shop today to get fitted properly and look at a few differnte bikes. They have a couple of closeout any opinions on either of these bikes both are priced at $1000 and i figure i can bargin a bit more with them.

Cannondale Synapse Road bikes. Aluminum frames (made in USA), carbon forks, Shimano Tiagra 9 speed components

Cannondale CAAD8-6C, 2010 model, Aluminum Frame, Carbon Fork, Tiagra 9 speed, compact crank

Thanks for the help.
I have the Synapse myself (2011 Synapse 6, Tiagra components). It's a nice bike and I'm very happy with it. Cannondale's aluminum frames are some of the best around in terms of value for money, and the ride is very smooth.

The main difference between the CAAD and Synapse series is that the CAAD is intended more for racing -- it's a bit shorter, more sensitive steering and a more racing like stance. Often people will use it as a race training bike and use a full carbon bike for racing. The Synapse is also very fast but more suited for longer rides. $1K is definitely a good deal, I believe the MSRP is around $1.2K with the Tiagra components.
BlackEleven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 08:34 AM   #74
bossy22
Powerplay Quarterback
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Exp:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TimSJ View Post
Wife is headed to her local shop today to get fitted properly and look at a few differnte bikes. They have a couple of closeout any opinions on either of these bikes both are priced at $1000 and i figure i can bargin a bit more with them.

Cannondale Synapse Road bikes. Aluminum frames (made in USA), carbon forks, Shimano Tiagra 9 speed components

Cannondale CAAD8-6C, 2010 model, Aluminum Frame, Carbon Fork, Tiagra 9 speed, compact crank

Thanks for the help.
Cannondale is known for their aluminum. Like BE said synapse is the 'comfort' bike. Great for long distances. It has a longer headtube and less-steep seat tube which brings the rider up slightly.
When I bought my cyclocross bike for commuting, I test road a number of bikes. I had a $1500 limit, so I kept in that range. The Cannondale felt the best to me, but it had a crappy wheelset. I happened to have some Mavic Kysrium Elites kicking around so I bought the bike and swapped the wheels.

Last edited by bossy22; 06-21-2011 at 08:39 AM.
bossy22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2011, 09:41 AM   #75
Coys1882
First Line Centre
 
Coys1882's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Exp:
Default

Pylon - I found this dérailleur hierarchy list - would you agree for the most part?

For MTB
Acera entry; 24-speed, great braking and shifting impressive function, great price
Alivio active; 24-speed, great braking and shifting, stylish looks improved shifters, sleeker shapes, less weight
Deore enthusiast; 27-speed, great braking and shifting, light sweet parts and price
Deore LX sport; 27-speed, sweet braking and shifting, lighter, fine finish, durable nearly XT shifting and braking
Deore XT race; 27-speed, lighter, great braking and shifting, beautiful, more durable works nearly as well as XTR
XTR pro; 27-speed, superlight, phenomenal braking and shifting and ultra durable world's lightest and highest tech off-road parts group

For ROAD

Campagnolo
Mirage entry-level; double or triple w/9 cogs fine function; some steel parts
Veloce enthusiast-level; double or triple w/9 cogs nice function; less steel; better finish
Daytona serious-level; double or triple w/9 or 10 cogs most affordable 10-speed group
Chorus race-level; double or triple w/9 or 10 cogs almost Record quality and finish
Record pro-level; double or triple w/9 or 10 cogs world's lightest group

Shimano
Sora entry-level; double or triple w/8 cogs some steel; shifts and brakes great
Tiagra enthusiast-level; double or triple w/9 cogs less steel; more interchangeability
105 serious-level; double or triple w/9 cogs great price; hollow crankarms
Ultegra 600 race-level; double or triple w/9 cogs almost D-A quality; hollow arms
Dura-Ace pro-level; double or triple w/9 cogs Lance's group; superlight
Coys1882 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2011, 09:55 AM   #76
awildermode
Franchise Player
 
awildermode's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Exp:
Default

^for road, standard (now) is 10 cogs. campy has 11.

you are missing SRAM. their top groupo (Red) is the lightest. Lance uses (used) that the last 2-3 seasons.
__________________
AS SEEN ON TV
awildermode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2011, 10:04 AM   #77
bossy22
Powerplay Quarterback
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Exp:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coys1882 View Post
Pylon - I found this dérailleur hierarchy list - would you agree for the most part?

For MTB
Acera entry; 24-speed, great braking and shifting impressive function, great price
Alivio active; 24-speed, great braking and shifting, stylish looks improved shifters, sleeker shapes, less weight
Deore enthusiast; 27-speed, great braking and shifting, light sweet parts and price
Deore LX sport; 27-speed, sweet braking and shifting, lighter, fine finish, durable nearly XT shifting and braking
Deore XT race; 27-speed, lighter, great braking and shifting, beautiful, more durable works nearly as well as XTR
XTR pro; 27-speed, superlight, phenomenal braking and shifting and ultra durable world's lightest and highest tech off-road parts group

For ROAD

Campagnolo
Mirage entry-level; double or triple w/9 cogs fine function; some steel parts
Veloce enthusiast-level; double or triple w/9 cogs nice function; less steel; better finish
Daytona serious-level; double or triple w/9 or 10 cogs most affordable 10-speed group
Chorus race-level; double or triple w/9 or 10 cogs almost Record quality and finish
Record pro-level; double or triple w/9 or 10 cogs world's lightest group

Shimano
Sora entry-level; double or triple w/8 cogs some steel; shifts and brakes great
Tiagra enthusiast-level; double or triple w/9 cogs less steel; more interchangeability
105 serious-level; double or triple w/9 cogs great price; hollow crankarms
Ultegra 600 race-level; double or triple w/9 cogs almost D-A quality; hollow arms
Dura-Ace pro-level; double or triple w/9 cogs Lance's group; superlight
This is old. Dura-ace hasn't done triples in a few years...I don't think you can get a triple in ultegra either. We now have what is called a compact crankset. A regular crankset is 54/42 and a compact crank is 50/30. (some groupos offer slight variations of these). Compact cranks are awesome if you have hills to tackle. Also the rear cassette for Dura-Ace and Ultegra is 10 cogs...(I'm not sure about 105 and below. Lance uses Sram now.
Oh, almost forgot, Shimano Di2. THis is electronic duraace. pretty sweet. I've tried it, and it's the smoothest shifting you'll find.

Sram Road
Apex - entry level
Rival - serious level
Force - Race -Level
Red - Pro Level - Lances


What's new in mountain biking? double-cranksets and 10 speed cassettes
Shimano has two new xtr's, XTR race and XTR trail in this. The difference is the gearing for what you are doing. XTR trail would have an easier setup for climbing.

Sram offers this as well in most of their groupos as well as the standard triple cassette with a 9-speed cassette.

SRAM MTB
x-7 - entry level
x-9 - serious
x0 - race
xx - pro
bossy22 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to bossy22 For This Useful Post:
Old 06-22-2011, 11:01 AM   #78
Bill Bumface
My face is a bum!
 
Bill Bumface's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Exp:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by awildermode View Post
I know Chara is into cycling, wonder what size his bike is

As a guy an inch or two shorter than Chara, I can tell you it's not big enough unless he got something made (he probably did).

I'm looking at mountain bikes and even a 23" 29er is really not quite big enough.
Bill Bumface is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2011, 01:16 PM   #79
habernac
Franchise Player
 
habernac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: sector 7G
Exp:
Default

yeah, custom for sure.

Cannondale made a mtn bike years ago for Shaq. It's the only frame they've ever built that their frame testing device can't break. 33 inch frame or something like that.
habernac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2011, 01:49 PM   #80
Bill Bumface
My face is a bum!
 
Bill Bumface's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Exp:
Default

The moral of the story, never be really tall and not rich.
Bill Bumface is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:45 PM.

Calgary Flames
2017-18




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright Calgarypuck 2016