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Old 12-11-2013, 10:01 AM   #41
GoinAllTheWay
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Don't do it man, you'll take years off your life through drywall dust, frustration, and your non happy wife.

As someone who did an entire basement reno and thought "pfff how hard can taping/mudding be?" ... the answer is:

"VERY ####ING HARD"


I joke around that the whole reason I sold that house and moved was because of the drywall job I did in the basement... secretly I'm only half kidding.
I hear ya brother. My first mudding experience was in my basement too and I hated the way it turned out. I gradually got better at it as I've now done two washrooms as well but the only reason I think they turned out better is becuase they were so much smaller and I didn't overwhelm myself.

And oh that drywall dust.......it dries you skin into tanned cowhide. Sanding the ceiling was certainly a joy, my favourite part in fact. Sand till you cant see anymore, whipe off goggles, get dust in your eyes despite wearing goggles, go have a shower afterwards and basically cry drywall dust out of your eyes. Next time I'm just going to do a suspended ceiling.
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Old 12-11-2013, 10:13 AM   #42
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I've made it through our kitchen reno with all my tools but I've lost a good chunk of screwdriver bits.
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Old 12-11-2013, 10:27 AM   #43
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I must be the only one here who doesn't mind drywalling/mudding. It's not rocket surgery, the biggest difference between myself and the pro's is probably twice or three times the amount of sanding. That said, I still hire out when possible as the whole time vs. money ratio comes into play.
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Old 12-11-2013, 10:40 AM   #44
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The biggest difference between myself and the pros is the fact that I know where the flaws are in my mudding jobs, and am blissfully ignorant when someone else does it.

I bet if date rape drugged myself and did some mudding, it would be an awesome job, because in the morning I wouldn't know where all the minor mistakes that a 3rd party would never notice or care about, but somehow are unacceptable when I do it myself un-roofied.
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Old 12-11-2013, 10:50 AM   #45
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/\/\/\ lol

I'm sure I'm not the only one that applies a ton of the stuff only to wind up sanding 95% off.

I think the one thing that really improved the finish of my mudding jobs was buying one of those big mud stiring metal sticks. Jam that thing in their mounted to a drill and blend until "creamy". It goes on much smoother and thinner and that equals less sanding!

I also experimented with that adhesive tape that looks like it's made out of thread arranged in a grid patter. MUCH prefer the results of normal paper.

Last edited by GoinAllTheWay; 12-11-2013 at 10:54 AM.
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Old 12-11-2013, 12:30 PM   #46
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The biggest difference between myself and the pros is the fact that I know where the flaws are in my mudding jobs, and am blissfully ignorant when someone else does it.

I bet if date rape drugged myself and did some mudding, it would be an awesome job, because in the morning I wouldn't know where all the minor mistakes that a 3rd party would never notice or care about, but somehow are unacceptable when I do it myself un-roofied.

Then you wake up three days later with a trowel stuck in your ass!!


Wait, we can say Ass? Ass-some!!
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Old 02-14-2014, 12:53 PM   #47
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anybody know of associated costs involved with installing a range hood and ducting thru the roof?
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Old 02-14-2014, 01:21 PM   #48
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...that is all.
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Old 02-14-2014, 01:48 PM   #49
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I'm not handy in the slightest, but I've decided that this summer I am going to redo the laminate floors in my main room (roughly 450sqft).

The stuff I have right now was from the previous owner, and was quite clearly the .49 cents per sqft crap. People walk across it and it leaves impressions.

What AC rating should I be looking for? Should I get AC4 stuff or should I splurge for AC5? I have 2 pets, so it needs to be tougher.

I know the technology is pretty much snap on for the most part. What problems am I going to run into if I do it myself? I don't have a ton of curves in my place aside from a semi circular bar style table to the kitchen, so apart from that half moon, I have a couple door frames and that is about it for special cuts.

My moisture barrier and lower level is fine, so I don't think I want to replace it. I am just planning to rip off the current 12mm stuff and put new stuff on top.
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Old 02-14-2014, 02:59 PM   #50
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I'm wondering about basement development, and specifically about those load-bearing poles. What can you do with them? I assume that moving them is not good because it will cost a fair amount to do properly, but at the same time I don't particularly want a wall right where one is located. Any ideas?
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Old 02-14-2014, 03:09 PM   #51
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You could build out a box around it and wrap it in stone. Make it a pillar. Or just take it out. (Take pictures if you decide to take it out)
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Old 02-14-2014, 03:10 PM   #52
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I'm wondering about basement development, and specifically about those load-bearing poles. What can you do with them? I assume that moving them is not good because it will cost a fair amount to do properly, but at the same time I don't particularly want a wall right where one is located. Any ideas?
I don't think you can move them, unless you put in a steel beam.
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Old 02-14-2014, 03:17 PM   #53
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You could build out a box around it and wrap it in stone. Make it a pillar. Or just take it out. (Take pictures if you decide to take it out)
If I personally decided to take it out I have a feeling you would see the pictures on the cover of the newspaper!
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Old 02-14-2014, 03:27 PM   #54
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Anyone know what ever happened to Jonathon Taylor Thomas?
out of thanks, but the first response to the this thread was frigin hilarious
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Old 02-14-2014, 03:36 PM   #55
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Need to replace the hardwood flooring in a condo that got some water damage, it's a concrete floor (or a thin layer of concrete anyway) underneath with in-floor hot water heating, so I assume it's an engineered floor that I'm looking for?

First thought is porcelain tile in the kitchen / entry and stay with wood everywhere else.

Any alternatives out there that I should consider? It's a high end condo so I'll probably avoid laminate. Bamboo seems kind of nice but not sure if it's as durable, the stuff that's in there now still looks like new even though it is 14 years old.
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Old 02-14-2014, 05:37 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by CaramonLS View Post
I'm not handy in the slightest, but I've decided that this summer I am going to redo the laminate floors in my main room (roughly 450sqft).

The stuff I have right now was from the previous owner, and was quite clearly the .49 cents per sqft crap. People walk across it and it leaves impressions.

What AC rating should I be looking for? Should I get AC4 stuff or should I splurge for AC5? I have 2 pets, so it needs to be tougher.

I know the technology is pretty much snap on for the most part. What problems am I going to run into if I do it myself? I don't have a ton of curves in my place aside from a semi circular bar style table to the kitchen, so apart from that half moon, I have a couple door frames and that is about it for special cuts.

My moisture barrier and lower level is fine, so I don't think I want to replace it. I am just planning to rip off the current 12mm stuff and put new stuff on top.
AC 4 rating should be more than fine, what kind of pets do you have? You should definitely cut the door jambs to slide the material underneath if it isn't done already. Is the curved area going to leave a gap or is there a trim covering it?
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Old 02-14-2014, 05:47 PM   #57
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Originally Posted by photon View Post
Need to replace the hardwood flooring in a condo that got some water damage, it's a concrete floor (or a thin layer of concrete anyway) underneath with in-floor hot water heating, so I assume it's an engineered floor that I'm looking for?

First thought is porcelain tile in the kitchen / entry and stay with wood everywhere else.

Any alternatives out there that I should consider? It's a high end condo so I'll probably avoid laminate. Bamboo seems kind of nice but not sure if it's as durable, the stuff that's in there now still looks like new even though it is 14 years old.
I would recommend tile in the kitchen area and wood everywhere else like you said. As for the hardwood material bamboo is nice but doesn't fare too well in Calgary's climate I find, it's just too dry here. If you are really thinking of going with bamboo, make its not the cheap stuff and make sure you can control the humidity in your condo to the materials specs. As for other material you can go with engineered hardwood either click together or glue together. You can also do a 3/4" solid hardwood as long as it it glued down to the subfloor. Also, does your condo board have specific rules on underlay or soundproofing?
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Old 02-14-2014, 07:40 PM   #58
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I think the current hardwood must be glued down to a subfloor, but I didn't see any kind of soundproofing material.. if it is hopefully the condo corp will pay for replacing that if it's part of the bylaws (then it wouldn't be considered a betterment like the hardwood itself is, the board is only paying for carpet there I have to pay the difference up to whatever I put in there).

Wasn't really stuck with bamboo, just had seen some recently and was wondering if there was something that was the "new standard" for nice stuff. Actually maybe I should go see some condo show units to see what the current styles are.

I really liked my wood

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Old 02-14-2014, 07:40 PM   #59
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AC 4 rating should be more than fine, what kind of pets do you have? You should definitely cut the door jambs to slide the material underneath if it isn't done already. Is the curved area going to leave a gap or is there a trim covering it?
Husky and a cat. When the husky gets excited, it is like a live roadrunner cartoon on the floor.

The door jambs aren't cut, they were worked around. 0.5cm thick trim on the kitchen edge, so it won't be much cover.
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Old 02-14-2014, 07:54 PM   #60
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I'm wondering about basement development, and specifically about those load-bearing poles. What can you do with them? I assume that moving them is not good because it will cost a fair amount to do properly, but at the same time I don't particularly want a wall right where one is located. Any ideas?
I made a box around mine to take it from an annoying pole to a slightly larger and more annoying drywalled in pole. Then I used it as an excuse to put a conduit across the ceiling at the same place for various media wiring. Thinking back, that was really a waste of time when you figure that most basement ceilings are going to be at least partially drop ceiling.

Anyway I don't know how expensive actually moving one is, but you should just chrome the hell out of it.

Embrace the pole.
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