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Old 05-16-2017, 12:21 PM   #41
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Ya, it's a tough tradeoff. I can excavate more but that means a steeper drop at the front drive. It will be temporary as one day I'll be repaving that and would lower it 6" or so. Good to know 10% is max, that makes it even more difficult to figure out...ugh.
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Old 05-16-2017, 12:22 PM   #42
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I was just looking at the OSB option, but wasn't sure how to finish it. Thanks for the idea! I get the feeling most of the interior will be a next year project. To many complications to work around right now. Wish I had a flat lot!
My shop has OSB, and I'm lazy, so instead of re-sheeting the garage I just painted it white. Looks good enough for my tastes.
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Old 05-16-2017, 12:23 PM   #43
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When I was talking to him it was going to be a 1-2 ft stub wall so maybe that made the difference?
Probably. Is this height because a section of the wall will be below grade for a portion? You might need the foundation engineered.

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Topfiverecords, who do you talk to at the city for the alley issues? I got a bit of a run around this morning, and have ended up with my favourite dept. in Calgary, the Roads dept. Is that who I should deal with for the alley issue?
I would try talk to someone at Building & Development first. I don't think Roads will be of much help, as IMO they're the most clueless department there is. Avoid them like the plague.

You're going to need permits anyways, so get all your answers through the permit office. You may be best to sketch your situation and take some photos down to the counter and get them to give you their opinion in person.
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Old 05-16-2017, 12:28 PM   #44
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Probably. Is this height because a section of the wall will be below grade for a portion? You might need the foundation engineered.

I would try talk to someone at Building & Development first. I don't think Roads will be of much help, as IMO they're the most clueless department there is. Avoid them like the plague.

You're going to need permits anyways, so get all your answers through the permit office. You may be best to sketch your situation and take some photos down to the counter and get them to give you their opinion in person.
Permits are for chumps and the weak! Just do whatever you want! Anarchy is the ticket!
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Old 05-16-2017, 12:31 PM   #45
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Permits are for chumps and the weak! Just do whatever you want! Anarchy is the ticket!
True, it is easier to get forgiveness than permission. But stop work orders and fines applied to your property tax bill might suck. Lawyers are also more expensive than permits.
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Old 05-16-2017, 12:33 PM   #46
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It's finally time for me to build a garage, and I'm going to have loads of questions so figured it would be easier to have a thread for it.

First question: My alley is lower than the garage level and I'm stuck with having a decent slope. It will be a 3 foot drop from the back of the garage to the alley, over 15 feet. So a 3:1 slope. Is this too steep? Should I do an apron with maybe half that slope, then be stuck with a steeper pitch for the rest?

Can I get the city to regrade this? It is sloped towards my yard a bit from erosion over the years, if it was level I'd guess it should be about 6" higher. I already had them come in last year and dump a bunch of fill because it was much worse before.
10% max slope from garage floor to road/lane.
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Old 05-16-2017, 12:48 PM   #47
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I skimmed the thread, but in addition to what has been mentioned, some things that I did/ wish I did:

- 2x6 studs instead of 2x4. Better for electrical and insulation, as well as being stronger.
- Run coax and Cat6 to the garage. Internet, TV, phone, etc. I like having a landline in the garage as it's the place I am most likely to need 911.
- Foam under the garage floor. Makes a huge difference working in there in the winter.
- As mentioned, stub wall the entire perimeter.
- Also as mentioned, drainage. You have an advantage with that slope that you can run it outside and through the apron.
- Can you bump the one side out to 22'? 34' the other way is awesome, but those extra 2 feet the other way might make or break things.
- With electrical, in addition to what was said about never too many plugs, I went with double gang boxes so each set of outlets can handle 4 plugs. I also alternated along the wall, so every other plug was on a different circuit. A few times you need a compressor running beside a table saw.
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Old 05-16-2017, 12:52 PM   #48
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Always do a 6" curb. Otherwise you have water penetration into your wall from the melt inside and you have to bring your exterior finish too close to grade on the outside. It's done all the time so your concrete guy is just being difficult.

Had a client in Crescent Heights who replaced his walls on slab garage after only a few years because the sill plates and stucco had deteriorated all the way around.
I agree with this. Your concrete guy is wrong. We did many curbs with the floor. Maybe he doesn't want to bother.
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Old 05-16-2017, 12:53 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by ken0042 View Post
I skimmed the thread, but in addition to what has been mentioned, some things that I did/ wish I did:

- 2x6 studs instead of 2x4. Better for electrical and insulation, as well as being stronger.
- Run coax and Cat6 to the garage. Internet, TV, phone, etc. I like having a landline in the garage as it's the place I am most likely to need 911.
- Foam under the garage floor. Makes a huge difference working in there in the winter.
- As mentioned, stub wall the entire perimeter.
- Also as mentioned, drainage. You have an advantage with that slope that you can run it outside and through the apron.
- Can you bump the one side out to 22'? 34' the other way is awesome, but those extra 2 feet the other way might make or break things.
- With electrical, in addition to what was said about never too many plugs, I went with double gang boxes so each set of outlets can handle 4 plugs. I also alternated along the wall, so every other plug was on a different circuit. A few times you need a compressor running beside a table saw.
That's genius. Double gang boxes is also a great idea. I did that at the work bench, but it would have been better to have done it everywhere.

Another thing on the boxes is to plan your workbench location while you're doing electrical so you can have the outlets at the right height. I almost had mine below the table height, but raised them at the last minute. Would have been a hassle had I neglected to do that.

Also, now is the time to throw some up outside the garage, too. I have a couple outside, plus one in the soffit, which is going to be great as we're adding patio lights this year.
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Old 05-16-2017, 12:54 PM   #50
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Permits are for chumps and the weak! Just do whatever you want! Anarchy is the ticket!
So you're a free man on the land, huh.
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Old 05-16-2017, 12:59 PM   #51
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So you're a free man on the land, huh.
And CP is my Embassy.
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Old 05-16-2017, 01:01 PM   #52
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Probably. Is this height because a section of the wall will be below grade for a portion? You might need the foundation engineered.
I have to have the foundation engineered anyway, it's over 55mē. I've got an engineer, but I want a solid plan before giving him the go-ahead. But ya, that's why I would have a higher wall.

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I would try talk to someone at Building & Development first. I don't think Roads will be of much help, as IMO they're the most clueless department there is. Avoid them like the plague.

You're going to need permits anyways, so get all your answers through the permit office. You may be best to sketch your situation and take some photos down to the counter and get them to give you their opinion in person.
Tried the Building dept first, they said talk to roads on the alley issue. And ya, me and the roads dept have an ongoing feud, though I'm not sure they are aware of me. Good idea on going to the permit office and seeing what they say. They may not approve of my alley/driveway plan anyway. So I've been sketching out another idea...
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Old 05-16-2017, 01:03 PM   #53
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I skimmed the thread, but in addition to what has been mentioned, some things that I did/ wish I did:

- 2x6 studs instead of 2x4. Better for electrical and insulation, as well as being stronger.
- Run coax and Cat6 to the garage. Internet, TV, phone, etc. I like having a landline in the garage as it's the place I am most likely to need 911.
- Foam under the garage floor. Makes a huge difference working in there in the winter.
- As mentioned, stub wall the entire perimeter.
- Also as mentioned, drainage. You have an advantage with that slope that you can run it outside and through the apron.
- Can you bump the one side out to 22'? 34' the other way is awesome, but those extra 2 feet the other way might make or break things.
- With electrical, in addition to what was said about never too many plugs, I went with double gang boxes so each set of outlets can handle 4 plugs. I also alternated along the wall, so every other plug was on a different circuit. A few times you need a compressor running beside a table saw.
2x6 is in the plan, it doesn't cost much more in the scheme of things. I was pushing for 21' wide, but have to settle at 20 with that plan as it is close to the house and would start blocking the kitchen window. My wife vetoed that. 20 should be fine with the staggered vehicle parking as shown in my first image.
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Old 05-16-2017, 01:08 PM   #54
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So if I can't make the front/rear design work, this might be an option. It's 22x32 with an 18 ft wide front door. The red would possibly be a 1 foot high wall, and the garage would be set down maybe 1.5 ft. With it being set farther back it might be clear from the kitchen window enough to not matter. Unfortunately it leaves a bit more driveway at the front.

The other issue is I get close to the gas line. The sidewalk would be just over the edge of it. Is that allowed? I know the building can't go on it, but sidewalk should be fine, right?
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Old 05-16-2017, 01:08 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by ken0042 View Post
I skimmed the thread, but in addition to what has been mentioned, some things that I did/ wish I did:

- 2x6 studs instead of 2x4. Better for electrical and insulation, as well as being stronger.
- Run coax and Cat6 to the garage. Internet, TV, phone, etc. I like having a landline in the garage as it's the place I am most likely to need 911.
- Foam under the garage floor. Makes a huge difference working in there in the winter.
- As mentioned, stub wall the entire perimeter.
- Also as mentioned, drainage. You have an advantage with that slope that you can run it outside and through the apron.
- Can you bump the one side out to 22'? 34' the other way is awesome, but those extra 2 feet the other way might make or break things.
- With electrical, in addition to what was said about never too many plugs, I went with double gang boxes so each set of outlets can handle 4 plugs. I also alternated along the wall, so every other plug was on a different circuit. A few times you need a compressor running beside a table saw.
This. My rental property is 2x4 and in -25C, it get's to -10C in the garage if it's over a couple of days. My new garage is 2x6 and better insulated. It hasn't dropped below +5C in there. I did add an electric heater for when I work in the garage. I didn't need anything more since my garage stays relatively warm.
Also, I have hot and cold taps in the garage and drains in each bay. So nice.
I do wish I had more plugs.
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Old 05-16-2017, 01:38 PM   #56
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I think you'll have to look at the grades further for sure. You have a 12" slope across the garage doors, I don't see how the doors will be able to close flat against the ground with that kind of slope.
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Old 05-16-2017, 01:58 PM   #57
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there is some great ideas in this thread. the CP collective should band together and build the garage amish style. Get it done in a day.
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Old 05-16-2017, 01:59 PM   #58
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there is some great ideas in this thread. the CP collective should band together and build the garage amish style. Get it done in a day.
I can help, but my garage-raising skills are abysmal.
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Old 05-16-2017, 02:02 PM   #59
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I think you'll have to look at the grades further for sure. You have a 12" slope across the garage doors, I don't see how the doors will be able to close flat against the ground with that kind of slope.
The floor will be flat, the slope is the existing yard. So I'll have to excavate a lot.
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Old 05-16-2017, 02:06 PM   #60
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The floor will be flat, the slope is the existing yard. So I'll have to excavate a lot.
Ah gotcha. Ideally 2% floor slope toward the(a) door is what you want.
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