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Old 06-15-2017, 11:30 AM   #21
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Yeah thought it was sarcasm just wasn't sure ... That being said I did a lot of stupid things as a young coach coming right out of playing at a high level brought the college intensity to coaching - not proud of that...

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Old 06-15-2017, 12:07 PM   #22
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Yeah thought it was sarcasm just wasn't sure ... That being said I did a lot of stupid things as a young coach coming right out of playing at a high level brought the college intensity to coaching - not proud of that...
Thats the thing, I started as a kid and over time became really, really good at it, some of the players I was working with are in the National program now. I'm still telling major soccer programs to leave me alone but my phone still rings.

But I made mistakes, some really big ones too, being a coach is tough and any coach that says they never screwed up is lying through their teeth.

I started young, I made mistakes, I took advantage of some of those mistakes and others I had to take in the teeth, but its the acknowledgement that you made them and using that knowledge to not make them again is whats most important.

You get people who take themselves so seriously despite the fact that they're coaching 10 year-old girls' rec soccer that it becomes a detriment.

You're the coach. You're responsible. You have to never forget your goals and the goals of your team and your season and never let your personal goals or ambitions get in the way.

I used the word 'never' a lot of times in that paragraph despite knowing its total crap, we're human and we get caught up in the moment like everyone else, its hard. I use humour to deal with it. Others do things differently.

I've got all kinds of crazy stories and they're not all going to paint me in a good light. Just like you. I'm sure we all do.
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Old 06-15-2017, 12:49 PM   #23
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So I thought I would switch gears with some thoughts, especially after day two of our tryouts.

So last night I wanted to spend a bit of time afterwords talking to coaches on the other team and even our coaches.

We as coaches sometimes get tied up in things like systems and winning and scoring points or stopping other teams from scoring points.

So the discussion I had last night so we could refocus a bit is why are we coaching, what's our core motivation for coaching.

Is creating a winning program the end all and be all? Don't get me wrong, winning is always important. The organization that I'm with is in a elite level league and both Cowboys teams are always very competitive.

So talking to our coaches we talked about why we're here and we came up with some interesting answers that I think we can apply to our coaching styles

1) We want to make these kids better citizens, we want to teach them to respect and be respected. To be able to take any situation and apply what they've learned in sports and be able to apply it to their life or school or whatever

2) getting the kids active and involved. The term getting them off of the streets is a term that's used a lot and it valid. Getting them around other kids and helping them to connect in a team environment and start building a positive support system.

3) Whats our goal. We have a lot of players that come through that are elite for their level and are going to get looks from CIS schools for example. So how do we take the kids that have never played football before and give them the tools to play the game. How do we take the poor players and make them average, the average players and make them stars and take the Stars and make them elite.

4) How do we make the game fun and make the kids fall in love with the game, while at the same time progressing as coaches. The old school mentality is still there, the hyper competitive I demand perfection coach with the coaching intimidation factor is actually chasing players away from the game. It doesn't work. What do we as coaches need to do and learn and share to become both effective teachers and effective communicators in practice and on game day.

5) Player safety and how do we start winning the public relations battle. We can all agree that concussion news and movies like Concussion didn't help contact sports. So how can we teach players to play safely while still being effective. How do we show that as custodians of a parents kid and of the sport start reducing injuries and reducing concussions. As coaches now we all have to have safe contact certification. However we need to teach it at every practice and drill it and become effective. So we have to make sure that all of the coaches have bought in, there are still too many put your helmet in their chest coaches in football. To combat that as coaches we have to sell those old school coaches in terms of the benefits of safe contact and heads out play, at the same time we can't tolerate coaches that don't teach it.


So the other thing and its briefer. We talked about coaching relationships. Kids are like sponges they pick up everything that's negative. So if coaches can't get along player will pick that up.

As an OC I have a staff that reports to me. My job is to design the scheme, create the game plan and make sure its executed. however last year I was a bit of a tyrant on that because it was my first year running an offense and I didn't want to fail. So I told the coaches the how and why of position coaching and because of that for a while, the position coaches bristled.

In this day and age even if your a head coach or a coordinator or whatever, you have to be collaborative you have to leverage their knowledge, but at the same time you have to be able to know when to put your foot in the dirt and not budge.

So and for example. On day one of tryouts I decided to work with running backs. I prepared a list of what I wanted to do and I basically monopolized the individual skills time in practice. But I made sure that I asked the position coaches for feed back first. Last night I went to the position coach and said, I had my time yesterday, I'm here to assist you and learn what you like to do. This time is yours.

The last point with coaches, is how can you make it fun for coaches. We're all volunteers we don't do this for money, so how can we make this enjoyable.

The responses that came back from my assistants were enlightening.

First of all be creative. In football we're seeing a lot of stagnation in terms of most coaches run 5 or 6 plays that work for them and they drill it over and over again. Coaches and players get bored. I worked with my coaches with a goal that every week we'd try something new and they came back with some pretty fun stuff.

We worked with the kids on our bread and butter but we also inserted. So we went from a team that went from just running a I formation, to a Ace formation power, to having unbalanced receivers to running a trips bunch spread to running a pistol Wishbone. And the coaches challenge was how can we adopt our bread and butter in all of these formations. The coaches and the players really enjoyed the challenge, but it got the coaches to flex their creative muscles, feel more involved and take some owners ship.

Oh and last, don't be afraid to give coaches more responsibilities. We talked about letting each position coach take one game at the Jamboree to be the "offensive coordinator" and make calls and decisions. I let coaches make calls in practice as well and we talked about each coach letting me know what they want to see in practice games or scrimmages.

Just my 2 cents
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Old 06-20-2017, 11:33 AM   #24
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What sort of certifications/course are you all taking, if any?
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Old 06-20-2017, 11:45 AM   #25
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Me personally I took I guess what you can call a level 1

Level one for football includes

Making ethical decisions
Introductory to position coaching with at least one position
Position wise I have

Defensive backs/Linebackers/defensive line
Quarterbacks/Offensive line/ running backs. I'd like to get wide receivers but it never seems to be available.

This year for Football Alberta you cannot coach if you don't have Safe Contact, so I got that last year.

The next step for me to get to level 2 or coordnator is to have an on field evaluation

Where I have an evaluator review my practice plan, go through the steps of pre practice prep and then run a practice.
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Old 06-21-2017, 11:15 AM   #26
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Well as an update, our draft is over now and we officially have selected the Cowboy Grey and Cowboy Navy teams.

Tonight I get to start the offensive insertion.

It was kind of funny last night because we've got all these kids that have either come up from Pee Wee or never played before. So I'm giving them the old speech about hard work and being prepared so that we can have a fun, explosive and creative offense.

So I'm telling them that the playbooks will go out at the start of July and that it might look daunting but they'll have a month to study it and come ready to go and offensively its not that hard to learn. I turn to one of our returning lineman and basically go, It wasn't that hard to learn was it? And he looks me dead in the eye and says "Coach it was the hardest thing I've ever had to learn in my life" Then he pauses for a minute and starts laughing.

Thanks a lot kid.
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Old 06-22-2017, 03:25 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainCrunch View Post
Me personally I took I guess what you can call a level 1

Level one for football includes

Making ethical decisions
Introductory to position coaching with at least one position
Position wise I have

Defensive backs/Linebackers/defensive line
Quarterbacks/Offensive line/ running backs. I'd like to get wide receivers but it never seems to be available.

This year for Football Alberta you cannot coach if you don't have Safe Contact, so I got that last year.

The next step for me to get to level 2 or coordnator is to have an on field evaluation

Where I have an evaluator review my practice plan, go through the steps of pre practice prep and then run a practice.
I have taken all the soccer courses in the NCCP for the community stream. My next stage is the Licensing stream but I do not think I will take that. Only coach my son in summer as he plays hockey in the winter
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Old 06-22-2017, 03:29 PM   #28
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My son's team wasn't playing very well early in the season. I just couldn't motivate them. Goofing off at practice, not listening etc... Took a page out of the Atom hockey play book (golden jersey from McDonald's) and created the "golden boot". Bought some cheap shoes, sprayed them gold. After each game I give one to the "best" offense player and one to the best defensive player. Made a world of difference. Some times it the small things that work.
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Old 06-23-2017, 08:48 AM   #29
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We did a sledge hammer for one of the teams defenses.

And for offensive line we got a really ugly 70's style gold jersey with a bunch of stars that the best offensive line man got to wear in practice.

So just an update, with the draft finished and the teams picked, we took a couple of days to continue to work on split, but also got to start doing our insertion.

I decided to insert our base package that every other play comes from. So I decided on Wednesday to take the offense off of the field and take them into a locker room for chalk talk. The first question I asked is how many of you have never played organized football. When a bunch of kids put their hands up, I knew I had to start with the basic "This is a football" lesson.

So I went over how we send plays in, how the Quarterback calls the play, huddle stuff. And then I took my base plays and used them to explain how the playcalls described the plays

Ace formation under center
20 dive
21 dive
34 dive
35 dive
38 toss
37 toss
36 kick pop
35 kick pop
Quick pass 5555
Quick pass 9007
Quick pass 1881
HB Screen LT 4937
HB Screen Rt 7394

I would then call one play and draw them up. Then I'd get volunteers to come up and get a play call from me and draw it on the board after asking the QB how he would call it in the huddle.

The payoff.

Yesterday we went on the field and started doing our walk through, the the run through, and then we were able to call the plays at game tempo.

It was a lot of fun for the first night of running plays even if it was just against air.

So we have two more nights before the July break, now we're going to bring in a full defense (last night we graduated to playing against a front 7 holding bags made up of coaches)

So the funny moment last night, we were working on safe contact and doing pursuit drills. And I yelled out "Are we all going to work on this during your summer break?"

And all of the players of course yelled back "yes coach"

And then I asked who they were going to practice against and I got 8 million answers. Some of the highlights

"Mean Mr Magarnical"
"A tree"
"Air"
"A moving car"
"my girlfriend"
"Ninja my dad"

It cracked me up
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Old 06-23-2017, 09:06 AM   #30
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My son's team wasn't playing very well early in the season. I just couldn't motivate them. Goofing off at practice, not listening etc... Took a page out of the Atom hockey play book (golden jersey from McDonald's) and created the "golden boot". Bought some cheap shoes, sprayed them gold. After each game I give one to the "best" offense player and one to the best defensive player. Made a world of difference. Some times it the small things that work.
Team Trophies work, theres a reason every hockey team has one.

I've had a few, I started with a soccer ball that everyone signed and you got to keep it until the next game, I've used one of those stupid bowling trophies they give you on your birthday, a Calgary Flames car flag (I needed something so I rummaged through my car, it was that or jumper cables), I tend to find that the more ridiculous the trophy the more prestigious it is to have earned it.

Granted, thats with teenage boys, they're insane.
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Old 06-29-2017, 11:32 AM   #31
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so in terms of pre prep as coaches do you do a lot of film work?

Last year, I used Huddle for Film. I would review every offensive play, break it down and use the draw features to point out issues with each play. Or great execution on plays. I feel that kids nowdays are pretty much visual. I also put up the opposition for next weeks game, and I tend to put out a scouting report of key defensive formations and coverage and and key personal.

In terms of time, I think it takes me most of Sunday to do this, so maybe we should be exchanging ideas on what you guys do and how you plan your week.

so Sunday typically for me is

Review our film and breakdown
Review upcoming opponents film create a scouting report
Work on a practice plan, that includes recommendations for position coaches on what skills need to be worked on.
Send out film to the coaches and players.

Create a quick offensive game sheet so that we can run scout for our defense.

Then during the summer we practice Tuesday to Thursday.

When the season starts its games on Saturday and 3 practices a week.

What do you guys have to or do to prepare for the week,

More important how do you distribute work to other coaches, whats the breakdown of labor?
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Old 06-29-2017, 11:49 AM   #32
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On our team I am in charge of breaking down film for our defence and scouting our opponent's offence. Every year we do more film and I think that the benefits of doing it show up in the kids play on the field. Hudl is a great tool but I feel like I am not using it to its full potential. This year I want to organize plays by formation, down and distance, and play type to make it easier to go back and find tendencies. If you've got any tips for using Hudl I'd love to hear it

We don't focus too much on our own film. There may be a few plays we show to highlight something we did well or poorly, but we move on fairly quickly. We spend a lot of time on our opponents looking for tendencies (always pass to the right, always run on 1st down, their right tackle gives the play away every time by his stance, etc). We'll do a statistical breakdown on their run vs pass tendencies and strong vs weak preferences.

I also diagram the opponents plays and we run a scout offence twice a week during practice
Having our defence react and see what the opponent runs has been really beneficial. I probably spend half a day or so prepping this stuff over the weekend. By now I've got a pretty good database and the various team's play books don't change too much year to year so I'm able to save time that way
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Old 06-29-2017, 12:05 PM   #33
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My son's team wasn't playing very well early in the season. I just couldn't motivate them. Goofing off at practice, not listening etc... Took a page out of the Atom hockey play book (golden jersey from McDonald's) and created the "golden boot". Bought some cheap shoes, sprayed them gold. After each game I give one to the "best" offense player and one to the best defensive player. Made a world of difference. Some times it the small things that work.
Wish we had you as a coach for soccer this year. I tried to talk to my boy about joining something other than crappy community soccer, but he said no. The guy didn't show up half the time and when he did, he didn't teach them anything new, didn't help them with positions (first time on a full soccer field for most of them) very little in-game feedback.

The results were very predictable: they were awful. Coach's kid was a good player, probably their best, but he was also a sore loser ball hogging poor sport. He faked injury twice to get out of playing games that they were getting their tails handed to them in.

Probably the last time he will play as he told me he's not signing up for soccer next year. He tells me that it isn't because of his experience this year, but I'd be surprised if it wasn't. At least he's picked something else. I just hope 12 isn't too late for your first ever season of little league.
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Old 06-29-2017, 12:53 PM   #34
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Wish we had you as a coach for soccer this year. I tried to talk to my boy about joining something other than crappy community soccer, but he said no. The guy didn't show up half the time and when he did, he didn't teach them anything new, didn't help them with positions (first time on a full soccer field for most of them) very little in-game feedback.

The results were very predictable: they were awful. Coach's kid was a good player, probably their best, but he was also a sore loser ball hogging poor sport. He faked injury twice to get out of playing games that they were getting their tails handed to them in.

Probably the last time he will play as he told me he's not signing up for soccer next year. He tells me that it isn't because of his experience this year, but I'd be surprised if it wasn't. At least he's picked something else. I just hope 12 isn't too late for your first ever season of little league.
I've seen that a lot.

Without knowing the specifics I can address this issue:

- The Coach's kid being the best player always, always sucks. There are typical reasons for this and you're not going to like them.

The kid is likely too good for that level of play but the Dad isnt good enough to coach a higher level, but the kid and the Dad have to be together otherwise the Dad isnt going to coach (which is likely needed) and the kid isnt going to play ($$).

One of the things that I got to experience is something that most Volunteer coaches dont get to, I get the impression that CaptainCrunch is the same way, but I dont know about you, but I was a 'Non-Parent Volunteer.'

No favourites.
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Old 06-29-2017, 01:09 PM   #35
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I've seen that a lot.

Without knowing the specifics I can address this issue:

- The Coach's kid being the best player always, always sucks. There are typical reasons for this and you're not going to like them.

The kid is likely too good for that level of play but the Dad isnt good enough to coach a higher level, but the kid and the Dad have to be together otherwise the Dad isnt going to coach (which is likely needed) and the kid isnt going to play ($$).

One of the things that I got to experience is something that most Volunteer coaches dont get to, I get the impression that CaptainCrunch is the same way, but I dont know about you, but I was a 'Non-Parent Volunteer.'

No favourites.
That happened this year for me. My son made a higher team but the lower team needed a coach. The higher team had 5 coaches already. Since I volunteered to coach he was demoted. This is not a problem for me but it sucked for him as all his friends made the higher team.

IF you can have non-parent coaches that is the best, but those are hard to come by at the younger ages.
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Old 06-29-2017, 01:18 PM   #36
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On our team I am in charge of breaking down film for our defence and scouting our opponent's offence. Every year we do more film and I think that the benefits of doing it show up in the kids play on the field. Hudl is a great tool but I feel like I am not using it to its full potential. This year I want to organize plays by formation, down and distance, and play type to make it easier to go back and find tendencies. If you've got any tips for using Hudl I'd love to hear it
So to give you an idea of what I do, and probably why it takes to long. For every offensive play we run on film, I fill in the following information



Sorry for the stretch. But this allows Huddle to track most of the stats and tendencies, usually I would enter in yard line down and distance as well. That way I can either use Hudl reports, or export to excel for my own breakdown package.

you can go absolutely crazy on tracking and reports, but by entering in the above I keep it simple.

In terms of what gets delivered to the coaches and players. The drawing and text tools are huge for me.

I tend to break down multiple times per play or none at all depending on what I see, that way I get my cues if we are doing a film session with the players

By entering in the play information you do get a nice banner line across the top of the video



Then I start doing personal breakdowns, and you can mix technique praise and questions for film session







As an add on, I love the Hudl playbook, not only because I can create a playbook easily, but as I go through the season and I see a succesful play I can attach that video right to the playbook card, so that new players when they review the playbook can see the video of how it should be run.





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We don't focus too much on our own film. There may be a few plays we show to highlight something we did well or poorly, but we move on fairly quickly. We spend a lot of time on our opponents looking for tendencies (always pass to the right, always run on 1st down, their right tackle gives the play away every time by his stance, etc). We'll do a statistical breakdown on their run vs pass tendencies and strong vs weak preferences.
I tend to be a bit opposite at the start of the year as everything is technique and understanding. As we move through the year that shifts, as well, but we ask our players to do a lot of self study of the opponent films as well

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I also diagram the opponents plays and we run a scout offence twice a week during practice
Having our defence react and see what the opponent runs has been really beneficial. I probably spend half a day or so prepping this stuff over the weekend. By now I've got a pretty good database and the various team's play books don't change too much year to year so I'm able to save time that way
I tend to like your idea of tendencies, because most coaches are creatures of habit, so if you break down using the export to spreadsheet feature in Hudl or their reports you can get a pretty wicked quick scouting report.
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Old 06-29-2017, 01:22 PM   #37
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That happened this year for me. My son made a higher team but the lower team needed a coach. The higher team had 5 coaches already. Since I volunteered to coach he was demoted. This is not a problem for me but it sucked for him as all his friends made the higher team.

IF you can have non-parent coaches that is the best, but those are hard to come by at the younger ages.
Yeah, it sucks. I totally understand it.

If your kid is good enough to play Tier 1 but those coaching spots are filled, and they should be filled by staff coaches, if you're coaching at the top level as a designated non-parent coach then thats a whole other ball game.

But I can then totally understand a parent-coach not wanting to coach a team that their kid isnt on. Families have logistics to deal with, at the end of the day these are kids and their parents are mothers and fathers and employees.

You cant expect them to say: "Well, my kid will play on this team and I'll coach this team. Twice as much work means twice as much fun!!!"

Yeah. No. doesnt work that way.
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Old 06-29-2017, 01:30 PM   #38
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I've seen that a lot.

Without knowing the specifics I can address this issue:

- The Coach's kid being the best player always, always sucks. There are typical reasons for this and you're not going to like them.

The kid is likely too good for that level of play but the Dad isnt good enough to coach a higher level, but the kid and the Dad have to be together otherwise the Dad isnt going to coach (which is likely needed) and the kid isnt going to play ($$).

One of the things that I got to experience is something that most Volunteer coaches dont get to, I get the impression that CaptainCrunch is the same way, but I dont know about you, but I was a 'Non-Parent Volunteer.'

No favourites.
I'm a non parent volunteer, and we don't have a lot of parent coaches because they're not as committed long term to the program (my kids done, I'm out of here).

We want to be able to honestly coach and evaluate all of the kids and have the same level of communication, sometimes that's tough with parent coaches.

Not saying we don't use them, but they have to pass the smell test of coaching, have the required certifications and be able to work with all the coaches.

What we do have that I like is that we encourage I guess what you'd call junior coaches, which are former players that maybe aren't moving on in play level, or have the whole accumulated injury thing, and we encourage them to come out and work with the position coaches. they can pass on their knowledge, it helps them stay in touch with the game and keeps them busy. And it crazy developes coaches.
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Old 06-29-2017, 01:36 PM   #39
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I've seen that a lot.

Without knowing the specifics I can address this issue:

- The Coach's kid being the best player always, always sucks. There are typical reasons for this and you're not going to like them.

The kid is likely too good for that level of play but the Dad isnt good enough to coach a higher level, but the kid and the Dad have to be together otherwise the Dad isnt going to coach (which is likely needed) and the kid isnt going to play ($$).

One of the things that I got to experience is something that most Volunteer coaches dont get to, I get the impression that CaptainCrunch is the same way, but I dont know about you, but I was a 'Non-Parent Volunteer.'

No favourites.
I don't think this guy had ever coached before in his life. At least, it sure appeared that way. We never received any communication from him after the initial introduction. The first time he didn't show up, the assistant coach had no clue he wasn't coming. Luckily, he had the soccer balls so we weren't totally screwed. The he missed a few more. Then we just got used to him not being there.

The parents of the kids on this team were also strange. It's u-12, so they should be sticking around still. There were maybe 3 parents there. The rest would just drop them off.
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Old 06-29-2017, 01:47 PM   #40
Locke
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Originally Posted by CaptainCrunch View Post
I'm a non parent volunteer, and we don't have a lot of parent coaches because they're not as committed long term to the program (my kids done, I'm out of here).

We want to be able to honestly coach and evaluate all of the kids and have the same level of communication, sometimes that's tough with parent coaches.

Not saying we don't use them, but they have to pass the smell test of coaching, have the required certifications and be able to work with all the coaches.

What we do have that I like is that we encourage I guess what you'd call junior coaches, which are former players that maybe aren't moving on in play level, or have the whole accumulated injury thing, and we encourage them to come out and work with the position coaches. they can pass on their knowledge, it helps them stay in touch with the game and keeps them busy. And it crazy developes coaches.
Ha! I was pretty much all of those.

I was playing Premier Men's League for a few years (after a few years off to heal injuries) and eventually I came to the realization:

"You're an Accountant bud. Liverpool or Bayern are not around the corner. Call it. You have go to work tomorrow."

Practices, Games, Travel, Injury, etc. It just wasnt worth it anymore.

Big reason I got into coaching. You know what they say about 'those who cant do?'

Well, I could still do it, but it hurt. A lot. So I decided to stop. Still hurts though.

It became something I wanted to be present for. I had coaches who knew what I could do and knew my injuries and didnt care and pushed me 110%. And for what? So I can be in my early 30s with two bad knees and wrecked ankles? Thanks..."insert swears."

I made mistakes, but I think I was honest with myself and my players and did the best I could for them, with a couple of exceptions for which I am 100% to blame.

And 'Parent Coaches' are important, but every Parent I've had has much preferred to be my assistant than run the team themselves.
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