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Old 06-02-2017, 11:02 AM   #1
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I don't know if anyone is interested in this, but I thought I would put this out there.

I know that there are quite a few members on this board that are coaches in multiple sports and multiple age groups.

I thought it might be nice to have a thread where we can talk about coaching, ask questions, exchange ideas, maybe in terms of things like coaching strategies and around drills and conditioning (because for the most part those things are fairly common).

I also thought it might be good to talk about certifications or things that we picked up from training.

I think we can also do things like talk about our coaching stories good and bad.

As well if there are people that want to get into coaching and have questions about it, we can help guide them. If maybe there are guys here looking for coaching help with their team and there are experienced coaches looking for a position, this could be helpful as well.


I mean I think that most of you know my story. But I'll put it here as a starter.

I've been coaching football for 12 years on and off. I got into it in the late 90's when I was asked to help coach defensive line at Forest Lawn for the Senior team. In my second year there I was moved to Defensive Coordinator and stayed for 2 1/2 more years.

I got back into coaching when I was asked to help Coach the Calgary Rage, in 2011. The Rage are a woman's tackle football team. I started with a similar story I was asked to come and help out and I coached the defensive line and linebackers. I then became their defensive coordinator for 3 years.

After that I got an opportunity to move onto the Calgary Bantam Cowboys Gray. they needed help with their offensive line and I stepped in. Last year they asked me to be their Offensive Coordinator. I'm now heading into my second season with the team and the tryout camp starts in a couple of weeks.

Anyways, I hope this thread has some activity.
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Old 06-02-2017, 02:13 PM   #2
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Great idea for a thread.

I have been coaching minor hockey for 8 years now on both with both my son and daughter. Started out as an assistant and ended up being asked to head coach my daughter's bantam team when they didn't have anyone else (I had volunteered to assist again). I absolutely loved doing that although I was nervous as hell at the start. I've been HC three seasons now and hope to coach her one more time in her final year of midget.

I've learned a ton about the game, about coaching, about others, and about myself over these years. Best advice I could give is to learn everything you can from others, there's no humility in that. Borrow ideas, steal drills, talk shop, don't do it all by yourself. I've had the good fortune to have assisted some really good coaches and the misfortune to have worked with some not so good ones. From that I have hopefully learned the good habits and learned what not to do.

You're always learning as a coach and every year has it's challenges. But it is also extremely rewarding.
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Old 06-02-2017, 03:08 PM   #3
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Yeah, even if it turns into more of a:

"This batcrap crazy thing happened and I need help" kind of thread.

I coached minor Soccer for 8 years, every age group and skill level.
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Old 06-02-2017, 03:29 PM   #4
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To be honest, I've been offered head coaching jobs in football, and I've never wanted to pursue it because it just seems like the administrative end of coaching, especially in football, where the coordinators basically make their game plans, decide on their rosters, and manage the calls.

Out of curiousity, I'm kind of interested in your certification requirements for your sports.

In football for example all coaches need to have taken the "Safe Contact", "ethical Decisions in coaching", "Introductory to position coaching" and a position just to get on the field now.

To get to the coordinator level you need multiple positions and a on field evaluation by a football alberta evaluate.
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Old 06-02-2017, 03:53 PM   #5
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For Alberta, coaching certification requirements can be found here
https://www.hockeyalberta.ca/coaches...-requirements/

I only coach community level hockey so it's fairly basis (Coach Level/Speak Out, Respect in Sport, Safety (ie First Aid type stuff), and Checking Skills. If you coach higher levels then you need some additional high performance type certification.

Honestly the certification (in my opinion) has very little to do with coaching skills (other than checking skills). Sadly most of it has to do with how to stay out of trouble or in others words stuff like bullying, harassment, respect etc. Unfortunately that seems to be part of the coaching world now and the other ongoing thread about the high school phys-ed teacher is a perfect example of why. Fortunately most of the minor hockey organizations are very good at providing their coaches with material, drills, plans, ideas, guidance etc. on actually coaching skills and all stuff on ice. There is good training there and a gold mine of on line resources.
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Old 06-02-2017, 04:01 PM   #6
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Good idea CC

http://m.cricbuzz.com/cricket-news/9...rview-ipl-2017

I really enjoyed this read.

Specifically the first part where he talks about coaching in general.

Spoiler!


It really speaks to me and my coaching.
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Old 06-02-2017, 04:03 PM   #7
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Best advice I could give is to learn everything you can from others, there's no humility in that. Borrow ideas, steal drills, talk shop, don't do it all by yourself.
I have a buddy that is a professional national level coach.

This is his approach, always learning, and he doesn't limit it to his sport, he pulls from other sports as well.

"Everyone can learn something from someone"
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Old 06-02-2017, 10:10 PM   #8
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I learned something from a coach that is now coaching at the college level.

When I was a younger coach, like most coaches I was a bit obsessed with drills, working on footwork, doing the cones, that bags, working on rips and swims for example.

But he pointed out two things that I later found were utterly brilliant.

If you run a lot of drills your players become exceptional at doing drills but they don't become exceptional players.

Its all in the stance stupid.

Seriously, those two things are huge in every sport.

You need to find a way to translate your drills into a game situation and it has to be unpredictable for the players.

If your footwork drills are on the ladder for example, find a way to incorporate change of directions into it, get them to turn on the ladder.

IF its linebackers and you use cones for footwork, add a ball carrier to the drill so that they get used to their footwork incorporated into game play.

In fact right now the only time I do pure footwork drills are in game warmups.

As for the Stance, he pointed out if your players don't know how to stand up, whether its on skates or cleats or whatever if they don't have a good starting position that allows explosive play they're always going to be a second behind the play.
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Old 06-03-2017, 08:03 AM   #9
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You know, man, when I was a young man in high school
You believe it or not, that I wanted to play football for the coach
And all those older guys
They said that he was mean and cruel but you know
I wanted to play football, for the coach
They said I was a little too lightweight to play lineback and so I'm playing right-end
Wanted to play football for the coach
'Cause, you know some day, man you gotta stand up straight unless you're gonna fall
Then you're going to die
And the straightest dude I ever knew was standing right for me, all the time
So I had to play football for the coach
And I wanted to play football for the coach
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Old 06-05-2017, 10:57 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainCrunch View Post
I learned something from a coach that is now coaching at the college level.

When I was a younger coach, like most coaches I was a bit obsessed with drills, working on footwork, doing the cones, that bags, working on rips and swims for example.

But he pointed out two things that I later found were utterly brilliant.

If you run a lot of drills your players become exceptional at doing drills but they don't become exceptional players.

Its all in the stance stupid.

Seriously, those two things are huge in every sport.

You need to find a way to translate your drills into a game situation and it has to be unpredictable for the players.

If your footwork drills are on the ladder for example, find a way to incorporate change of directions into it, get them to turn on the ladder.

IF its linebackers and you use cones for footwork, add a ball carrier to the drill so that they get used to their footwork incorporated into game play.

In fact right now the only time I do pure footwork drills are in game warmups.

As for the Stance, he pointed out if your players don't know how to stand up, whether its on skates or cleats or whatever if they don't have a good starting position that allows explosive play they're always going to be a second behind the play.
And if the kids done do the drills correctly then they become very good at doing them wrong! So lesson #1 with drills - ensure they are being done correctly or the way you want them to be done otherwise it's pointless.

Second point, in general I always try to end my practice with a few minutes of scrimmage/game with the idea that the kids can take what we worked on in the drills and use them in a game situation.
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Old 06-05-2017, 01:00 PM   #11
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And if the kids done do the drills correctly then they become very good at doing them wrong! So lesson #1 with drills - ensure they are being done correctly or the way you want them to be done otherwise it's pointless.
The one caveat is to ensure you are not practicing the drill instead of the skill. It is easy to do (I have done it), you focus on the correct completion of the drill at the detriment of the skill.
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Old 06-06-2017, 05:46 PM   #12
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So just to keep this fresh, and to selfishly bump it. We have our tryout camp for Cowboys Grey and Navy next week and it goes 3 days next week and 3 days the week after.

During that time, Grey and Navy will hold a draft of the new players while evaluating all of the players in terms of positions and roles.

Just to put this into perspective.

Out of my offense last year I have three returning players.

Those returning players are a offensive tackle and Guard that I'm going to convert to center. I also have one Wide Side Wide Receiver returning.

So I'm basically going to need at minimum 3 to 4 receivers a quarterback a half back, a fill back/tight end.

I'm also going to need some backups.

It should be an interesting camp.
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Old 06-13-2017, 02:46 PM   #13
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Cowboys are a great program... My son played two years for coach Woodson and two years for coach Cooper and loved every minute of it... The Cowboys teach the game well with a strong emphasis on respect - my son is a much better person for it. He has spent the past three winters working out with coach Woodson's son who starred with UofC and is now in camp with the Toronto Argos.

I actually played the first two seasons of the program back when I was a kid and believe it or not Coach Cooper was my coach... I still have a strong relationship with him.

On the coaching front I have many seasons as a baseball and hockey coach and made a living as a college baseball head coach for six-years with three seasons coaching pro... Additionally I've spent seven years as an area scout for the Expos and with Oakland. I am was a level-4 NCCP instructor through Baseball Canada and met many great coaches and players through that who are still good friends.

As said earlier in this thread you will know a good coach when they know they can learn from everyone and share their knowledge and experience with anybody who wants to learn. Coaching is a fraternity and good coaches realize that weather they are in the bigs or on a sandlot - we are all the same.
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Old 06-13-2017, 04:12 PM   #14
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That's awesome to hear Bossy, I work directly with Coop, so its been a learning experience for me. I was sitting here looking forward to the start of tryout tonight until I looked out the window.

Ah well football in the rain.
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Old 06-13-2017, 04:19 PM   #15
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That's awesome to hear Bossy, I work directly with Coop, so its been a learning experience for me. I was sitting here looking forward to the start of tryout tonight until I looked out the window.

Ah well football in the rain.
One of my assistant coaches was British. A huge Brit, like you read about, one of those guys who likes his pints black....and at 9am.

I was the coach that would still run practices in the rain and the parents hated me for it, to the point there was (albeit a very polite) protest.

Before I could answer and defend my policy of running practices in the rain my assistant coach steps in and bellows:

"If you cant play football (soccer) in the rain the English would never play football! Now get back to it!"

It was slightly less polite than that but you get the gist. I didnt cancel practices on account of rain.
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Old 06-13-2017, 04:21 PM   #16
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That's awesome to hear Bossy, I work directly with Coop, so its been a learning experience for me. I was sitting here looking forward to the start of tryout tonight until I looked out the window.

Ah well football in the rain.
Wouldn't be spring football if it wasn't in the rain!

I'm involved with one of the high school football programs and we hit the field next week for our week of spring camp. I'm looking forward to the year, I am returning 4 out of my 5 DB starters which should put us miles ahead of last year.

A lot of great advice and tips in here. I think the biggest one for me has been surrounding myself with people who understand the sport and not being afraid to ask questions, no matter how simple they may seem. Also, investing in the players as kids and not just athletes. Let them know you care about them beyond the field and develop life skills in them through the use of sport
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Old 06-14-2017, 11:31 AM   #17
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Night one

Man I suck at ladders and bags, most remember not to swear in from of players.
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Old 06-14-2017, 12:14 PM   #18
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Night one

Man I suck at ladders and bags, most remember not to swear in from of players.
Okay, I'll share a fun coaching story, I have lots of these but this was my first day all by myself.

I was brought in as a coach initially because a friend of mine was volunteering and they just didnt have enough people, so I was assisting him on his third team with the idea of replacing him as head coach because he was over-extended but my Police checks were still going.

So one day he tells me that hes going to be late for a game because he was coaching one of his other teams across town. No problem, I got this. But it was my first game going solo.

Now, I'm 21 at this point. Playing Men's league and rec and coaching, so I was pretty intensely into the game.

One thing that most of us know now is that with time and experience we learn to tone it down, even out the emotional rollercoaster. We may still lose it on a bad call or bad play from time to time, but less often and less intense.

This was my first day on my own taking a team that hadnt won a game that year, I got to set the lineups, warm them up and explain the game plan.

Its early in the first half and two of my players got a breakaway. I'm talking 2 on 0 (except goalie) and its our opportunity to take the lead for the first time!

First player shoots and hits the post but it goes directly to the second player who shoots and hits the crossbar but it goes right back to the first player who proceeds to shoot it over the bar.

I'm on the sidelines, and the parents kind of know me, but not really yet.

And I'm screaming my head off with obscenities.

"Are you MF'ing kidding me?!?! What are the goddamned MF'ing odds of that?!?!"

And so on and so forth. While right behind me my friend the coach walked up and tells me...

"You gotta relax man, first of all, their parents are like 10 feet away, they saw and most definitely heard that, and you're going to kill yourself with the stress."

It was a valuable lesson really, I was a kid and I wanted these kids to win so badly that I lost my focus.

The funny part was though, that they saw that desire and they wanted to win for me too and that was something that was hard to balance because while we want to win, it wasnt the primary focus at that level.

The moral of the story is: "Swear in front of the children."

They love it. They're kids, they swear like sailors on shore leave when adults arent looking so it kind of endears you to them.

But make sure their parents cant hear you. Thats an important lesson as well.
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Old 06-15-2017, 10:50 AM   #19
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I'm confused ... your advice to coaches is to swear around kids that you are coaching so they will think your cool???
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Old 06-15-2017, 11:08 AM   #20
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I'm confused ... your advice to coaches is to swear around kids that you are coaching so they will think your cool???
Sorry, I thought that story kind of grew organically about the fact that the Coach should always be in control, both of his team and his emotions, but you're going to lose it from time to time, its about how you recover.

The 'swearing in front of the kids' thing was heavily sarcastic. I thought that was clear but evidently not clear enough.
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